Faculty News

If you are a student with publication/production news for us, send the info to Dana Miller, dana at gothamwriters dot com.

May 2018

  • Vol. 1 Brooklyn published David Rice's short story "Atheism.

  • Ada Calhoun's essay "The Wedding Toast I'll Never Give" is included on Bustle magazine's list of "15 Modern Love Columns Every Millennial Needs to Read." 

  • The Writer magazine features Ashley Shelby and her novel South Pole Station in its article about climate change-themed fiction, "The Rising Tide of Cli-Fi." 

  • Carmen Bugan's essay "Being An Immigrant Writer in America Today" is on PanMacmillan, a blog of the Macmillan publishing company. 

  • Rodale released Matthew Cody's chapter book How to Merit In Monsters, the first in a new series Strange Scout Tales

  • "Leaving aside the months I spent trying to figure out which geographical area the story would be set in (Britain? South Africa? Tahiti!), I figured there had to be some details about geography in the opening paragraph. However, there had to be some significant plot point as well. Something ominous, that would signal this was a mystery story, as well as a travel story." Susan Breen analyzes the opening of her short story "The End of the World" for the series The First Two Pages.  

  • En Route, a short film co-written and directed by Pamela Harris, is an official selection of the Blackbird Film Festival

  • Chloè Caldwell's essay "The Opposite of Light" appears in Lenny.

  • Doubleday announced it will publish C.J. Hauser's next novel, Family of Origin.

  • Weike Wang's essay "Something Left to Prove" appears in Lenny.

  • The Satirist published Jon Reiner's essay "White House Jobs Jared Kushner Can Do." 

  • Scott Alexander Hess talks about the real-life historical figures who inspired the characters in his forthcoming novel The Red River, and how the Mississippi River is a character in the story as well. 

  • Vice published Melissa Petro's essay "What Being a Sex Worker Taught Me About Men." 

  • The Queens Gazette interviewed Marie Carter about writing, history, and why she loves ghost tours in its Local-Express column. 

  • Mike Dunphy wrote "Vermont Has Film Festivals, but Does It Have a Film Industry?" for the Montpelior Bridge

  • Robert Repino's short horror story "Post-Truth" appears in Grotesque Quarterly Magazine

  • Dame magazine published Jennifer Keishin Armstrong's essay "Women Make the Best TV.

  • Jen Glantz's podcast You Aren't Getting Any Younger launched April 1st.

  • Medium published Benjamin Obler's short story "Judy and Merv." 

  • The Writer magazine published Jack Smith's article "Putting Words to Work: Figurative Langage in Fiction Results in Deeper Meanings and Poetic Beauty." 

April 2018

March 2018

  • Kody Keplinger's short story "Walking After Midnight" is included in the anthology All Out: The No-Longer-Secret Stories of Queer Teens Throughout the Ages, released in February by Harlequin Teen.

  • Sarah McColl tracks down the lost artwork of Jo Hopper and other women artists in "Woman In The Sun" for the Paris Review

  • Rodale Kids will release Matthew Cody's middle-grade novel How to Merit in Monsters on April 10th. 

  • Lifehacker published Alanna Schubach's article "How to Write the Personal Statement for College Applications.

  • Jil Picariello reviewed Martin McDonagh's new Off-Broadway play for ZealNYC in "Hangmen at Atlantic is Dark, Dangerous, and Damn Good." 

  • Carole Bugge offers some solid advice in "So You Want to Write Mystery Novels, Eh?" 

  • "I had earned the right to stand out, to be beautiful. I was a survivor, damn it. I was Grace Kelly," writes Laura Yeager in "I Feel Pretty Again After Cancer," for Cure Today.

  • HuffPost published Michael Montlack's essay "My Ancestry DNA Test Revealed Two Sisters I Didn't Know I Had."

  • Susan Breen's article "Stuck: Trapped in the Middle of Your Manuscript? Here's How to Move Forward" is the cover story for the February issue of The Writer magazine. 

  • Zaina Arafat edited and wrote the introduction to Bona Fide Relationships, an anthology of essays, stories, and poems responding to the United States' ban on travelers entering the country from certain nations, most of them majority-Muslim countries. 

  • Ravishly published Jen Glantz's article "The Best Valentine's Day Gifts to Give Someone You're 'Sort of' Dating." 

  • The Satirist published Jon Reiner's essay "Letters to President Trump from Terrified Children." 

  • Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich wrote A Step Into History: The Civil Rights Movement, a history book for middle-grade readers, for Scholastic

  • LitHub published the transcript of a panel discussion featuring T. Kira Madden on silence, "Every Time We Put Pen to Paper, It Is an Act of Protest.

  • "I wanted there to be more books that wanted to read." Kate Angus talks to the Rumpus about why she founded the publisher Augury Books, and what she hopes will happen now that it's an imprint of Brooklyn Arts Press

  • Rolling Stone published Lilly Dancyger's review of the documentary Citizen Rose in "Why New McGowan Doc Is The Messy, Imperfect Show #MeToo Needs."  

  • British artist Angelina Jane created a jewelry collection inspired by Carmen Bugan's poem "House of Stone." 

  • The Haunting of Torre Abbey by Carole Bugge has just been reissued by Titan Books as part of its The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes series. 

  • New York magazine's The Cut published Ada Calhoun's essay "What We Mean When We Say Marriage Is 'Work' "

  • Kirkus gave Meghan Kenny's new novel The Driest Season a starred review, calling it "a thoughtful, finely crafted work."

February 2018

January 2018

  • Dominic Preziosi interviewed New York City Public Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña in "We Want Thinkers, Not Robots," for Commonweal

  • The Rumpus published Amy Shearn's essay "An Open Letter to George Bailey." 

  • Carmen Bugan writes about the poetry of mental illness in her review of Square Inch Hours for The Harvard Review

  • Kaleidoscope, the literary magazine, will publish Laura Yeager's short story "The Almighty Caregiver of the Colonial Apartments" this month.

  • Dame magazine published Jennifer Keishin Armstrong's essay "Why The Odyssey's New Translation Matters to Women." 

  • Shelf Awareness named Ashley Shelby's novel South Pole Station to its list of Best Books of 2017.

  • Nelsie Spencer's novel The Playgroup will be released as an audiobook on January 18th. 

  • The Pulse Theater presented a staged reading of Carole Bugge's play Strings last month at The Producer's Club in New York City.

  • Narratively published Melissa Petro's essay "My Boyfriend Tried a Miracle Cure for Heroin Addiction." 

  • David Farley reviews the London outpost of Malibu Kitchen in "California Dreams (But No Palm Trees) at a London Restaurant" for the New York Times' Travel section. 

  • Skinny Dip named Domenica Ruta's memoir With or Without You to its list of "Fifteen Must-Read Books About Love, Life, and Being a Woman." 

  • Weike Wang's novel Chemistry is longlisted  the Aspen Words Literary Prize, a $35,000 prize for an outstanding work of fiction with social impact, and was named one of NPR's Best Books of 2017

  • Whale Road Review published N. West Moss' interview with author Jordi Alonso and her review of his poetry collection The Lover's Phrasebook

  • "One summer when I was a boy, my father entered into a friendly rivalry with a giant raccoon," writes Seth Fried in his short story "Mendessohn", published by Tin House.

  • Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing has released John Oliver Hodges' novel Quizzleboon.

  • David Leo Rice talks about giant squid, maple syrup, and the 1893 Chicago World's Fair, in an interview at The Coil

  • Tom Brennan's article "Joe Biden's Catholic Faith Is on Full Display on His Current Book Tour" appears in America magazine. 

  • Meerkat Press announced it will publish J.S. Breukelaar's Collision, a collection of a dozen short fantasy and horror stories, plus a novella, in 2019. 

December 2017

November 2017

  • Third Coast magazine published Nina Boutsikaris' essay "The Lights from Houses." 

  • The Piper's Apprentice, the final book in Matthew Cody's middle-grade Pied Piper adventure trilogy, is out now from Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers

  • Robert Repino talks about novels, '80s nostalgia, and Michael Mann with novelist James Scott on the TK Podcast.

  • Girlboss published Jen Glantz's essay "Five Unlikely People You Should Ask For Help When Starting a Business." 

  • The editors of Best American Essays 2017 cited work by several Gotham teachers as Notable Essays and Literary Nonfiction: Kate Angus for "When We Were Vikings;" Jacob Appel for "Why Get There from Here?"; and Shahnaz Habib for "A Letter to My Daughter About Palindromes." 

  • "Discussions of representation are important. But first there must be access." Kody Keplinger writes about the challenges facing disabled readers for Kirkus

  • Laura Yeager is blogging for Cure Today. Recent posts include "One Breasted Woman" and "Once a Cancer Writer, Always a Cancer Writer." 

  • Mike Dunphy writes about a poetry jukebox, a book wormhole, and the Prague Golem in "Ten Ways This European City Keeps It Weird—Really Weird" for Fodor's Travel.

  • Liveright Publishing, an imprint of W.W. Norton & Company, will publish Sarah McColl's memoir Joy Enough in 2019. 

  • Power plays, manipulations, and open kitchens — Susan Breen explores what writers can learn from the TV show House Hunters for the Miss Demeanors

  • The science fiction anthology Welcome to Dystopia: 45 Visions of What Lies Ahead includes stories from three Gotham instructors: J.S. Breukelaar, Jennifer Marie Brissett, and Paul Witcover. The book of stories about what the near future might hold is available for pre-order and will be released in December. 

  • "There is a way in which telling the story of what it means to live inside your own body becomes a target itself. The words of your story will balloon into punching bags. People will try to strip you of your very body-hood. Don’t let them. Be louder." T. Kira Madden talks about writing, courage, and the beauty of shaping experiences into stories, at The Tempest

  • Marie Claire published Melissa Petro's essay "Why I Support the Choice to Be Pregnant and a Prostitute." 

  • Lilly Dancyger explains "The Real Reason Nobody Is Talking about the DNC Fraud Lawsuit" for Playboy

  • Kirkus reviewed Jacob Appel's short story collection The Liars' Asylum, (released last month by Black Lawrence Press), calling it "a fine collection that amply demonstrates Appel's gifts." Meanwhile, Gallery Books, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, will release his new novel Millard Salter's Last Day on November 7th. 

  • Carmen Bugan will be interviewed by Sir Christopher Ricks during the Boston University European Studies Poetry Series on November 13.

  • "Moss's unerring ear allows her to tackle big thematic questions while never breaking away from her characters' voices," says The Literary Review of N. West Moss' short-story collection The Subway Stops at Bryant Park. Leapfrog Press released the book in May. 

October 2017

  • The New York Times published Elizabeth Cohen's essay "A Plague and a Blessing in My Empty Nest." 

  • Lilly O'Donnell wrote "The Man Who's Been Fighting for Medicinal Psychedelics For 45 Years" for Narratively

  • Electric Literature published Ben Obler's essay "How Writing Closed Captions Turned Me Off TV For Good." 

  • Nelsie Spencer's comic novel The Playgroup will come out in audiobook in November. 

  • Jody Gray is the Composer/Songwriter/Musical Director of the animated TV series Space Racers, which this fall will be a lynchpin on the new NBC Universal Kids Network.

  • Poets & Writers magazine published an excerpt of Carmen Bugan's memoir Burying the Typewriter

  • Vice published Melissa Petro's essay "I Had the Best Sex of My Life While Pregnant." 

  • On the same day it released her latest novel Run in paperback, Scholastic announced that it will publish Kody Keplinger's next YA novel That's Not What Happened in fall 2018. 

  • The Authors Guild Bulletin published Barbara DeMarco-Barrett's article "The Enemy Within." 

  • Narrative Species featured Robert Repino and his latest novel D'Arc in its article "Empowering Fun." 

  • Electric Literature published Alanna Schubach's essay "Actually, an All-Girls Lord of the Flies Could Be a Good Idea." 

  • Ian Port endured the hardship reporting for his article "One Great Place to Get a Beer in Every NYC Neighborhood" in StreetEasy.

  • The New York Times published Zaina Arafat's article "When Getting a College Degree Requires Self-Exile." 

  • Jil Picariello makes a few recommendations for what to see on Broadway this fall, for ZEALnyc

  • Oyster River Pages published Michael Backus' short story "Act of Love."

  • Stacy Parker Le Melle published her essay "Liberty and Justice for All: A Call to the Democratic Party" on Medium

  • LitHub published Ashley Shelby's essay "Toward a New Climate Change Genre: First Impact Fiction." 

  • Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine published Susan Breen's short story "The Countess of Warsaw." In September, Susan's novel Maggie Dove reached No. 1 on Amazon's best-sellers list in the Cozy Mysteries category. 

  • Black Lawrence Press will release Jacob Appel's latest short story collection The Liars' Asylum on October 15th.

  • "Altogether, her stories illustrate the importance of a gathering place such as Bryant Park, once a haven for druggies that was reclaimed in the 1990s," writes the Minneapolis Star-Tribune in its review of N. West Moss' short-story collection The Subway Stops in Bryant Park

  • Laura Yeager's article "The PSR Special Needs Program at Holy Family Parish in Stow, Ohio" appears in Catechist Magazine.

September 2017

August 2017

  • Off the Shelf included Jon Reiner's memoir The Man Who Couldn't Eat on its list of Best Beach Reads: 12 Memoirs to Read This Summer. 

  • Mike Dunphy wrote about having the "Perfect Day in Prague," away from the most heavily traveled tourism spots, for The Virtuoso Life

  • Dan Lopez's essay about the potential for literature to influence the international refugee crisis—"The Common-Sense Solution for Resettling Refugees That We All Missed"—appears in Good magazine. 

  • The Saturday Evening Post published N. West Moss' short story "The Absence of Sound." 

  • Jennifer Marie Brissett's short story “The Breeze in the Boughs” appears in FIYAH Magazine's "Sundown Towns" issue. FIYAH includes a Spotify playlist with each story, and Jenn's includes songs by Pearl Jam, Miles Davis, and The Mango Room.

  • Gamut magazine published J.S. Breukelaar's short story "Rogue's Bay 3013." 

  • Deadlines, elven rogues, a photo shoot, and a workshop: Lambda Literary spends A Week in the Life of Kody Keplinger. 

  • Glamour published Lilly Dancyger's article "Alaska Cops Defend Their 'Right' to Sexual Contact With Sex Workers Before Arresting Them." 

  • Hasanthika Sirisena talks about good teachers, risky choices, and the worst story she ever wrote in an interview with Fear No Lit

  • The New York Foundation for the Arts awarded T. Kira Madden a 2017 Artist's Fellowship in Nonfiction Literature.  

  • The Minneapolis Star-Tribune reviewed Ashley Shelby's novel South Pole Station, saying it offers several delights, keeps the plot "thrumming, [with] a keen eye for character and a sharp ear for smartass dialogue." 

  • Jil Picariello reviewed the Broadway revival of the play Marvin's Room, for ZealNYC

  • Ashley Shelby's novel South Pole Station has been named to several recommended reading lists this summer:  LitHub's Books You Should Read This July; The Millions' Most Anticipated Books in the Second Half of 2017; USA Today's New and Noteworthy; and  IndieBound's Indie Next list of Inspired Recommendations from Independent Booksellers. Picador released Ashley's novel last month. 

  • The literary journal Cottonwood published Ben Obler's short-story "The Secretary of Groveland" in its spring issue. 

  • "It Was Either Me or the Cat — And I Won," writes Melissa Petro for Good Housekeeping

  • "Must Hard Stories Be So Hard?" asks N. West Moss, in a book review for River Teeth

  • Stacy Parker Le Melle wrote about the poet Montana Ray, her collection (guns & butter), and guns' impact on individuals' feeling of personal safety for Of Note Magazine

  • Jennifer Marie Brissett's novel Elysium is analyzed in Tor.com's series "Expanded Course in the History of Black Science Fiction."

  • Quartz published Melissa Petro's essay "The Mindset That Makes Women Stay in Toxic Relationships." 

  • KQED Arts included Robert Repino's new novel D'Arc on its list of Science Fiction Futures You'll Want to Work to Prevent

  • Weike Wang's novel Chemistry made several recommended reading lists this summer:  Summer Books that Will Keep You Up All Night Reading from Newshour on PBS; Little Gems from the New York Public Library; 22 Exciting New Books You Need to Read This Summer by Buzzfeed; Books We Can't Wait to Read by New York magazine's Vulture blog; Notable Fiction Debuts from Poets & Writers magazine; Summer Reading Recommendations from Novelists Who Own Bookstores in the Las Vegas Sun. Weike is also one of the summer's recommended Debut Authors from the Book of the Month Club. Alfred A. Knopf published Weike's novel in May. 

  • Laura Yeager's essay "Chloe Goes Camping" appears in the latest issue of Fetch magazine.

  • Mike Dunphy appeared on the podcast Break Into Travel Writing to talk about schmoozing, pitching, and the battle between media and PR.

  • Aleteia published Laura Yeager's essay "How Growing Up in the Depression Taught My Mom to Look to the Church for Food."

July 2017

  • BBC Radio 4 named Carmen Bugan's memoir Burying the Typewriter its Book of the Week, and posted it as an audio series at BBC.com, available through August 9th. 

  • Jennifer Marie Brissett's short sci-fi story "The Executioner" appears in the new issue of Fantastic Stories

  • Jen Glantz appeared on NPR's Ask Me Another as the show's mystery guest, where the hosts tried to guess the job she works when she's not writing. (It's not her Gotham job either!) 

  • Little, Brown will publish Lev AC Rosen's latest novel Jack of Hearts (and Other Parts), a contemporary young adult story, in 2018. 

  • The Harvard Review published Carmen Bugan's "Fathers, Sons, and the Land in Between," a review of Hisham Matar's memoir The Return

  • Stephanie Paterik interviewed poet and memoirist Patricia Lockwood for AdWeek's "The Creative 100" issue. 

  • Kara Lee Corthron's play Welcome to Fear City premieres this summer at the Contemporary American Theatre Festival.

  • "This is how it was with the Great Disaster: Some people it shattered, and some people it made more themselves," writes Alanna Schubach in her short story "The Great Disaster" published in Recommended Reading

  • BoingBoing recommended Robert Repino's three-book War With No Name series in the article "Sentient Animals Rise Up and Defeat Humanity." SoHo Press released D'Arc, the most recent novel in the series, in May. 

  • Ashley Shelby wrote about the therapeutic benefits to writing about the things that make you angry in her essay "Indulge Your Climate Rage In Fantasy. It Helps" for Slate.

  • Melissa Petro's article "The Dos and Don'ts of Moving In With Your Significant Other" appears in Ravishly.

  • Black Lawrence Press will publish Nina Boutsikaris' memoir I'm Trying to Tell You I'm Sorry in 2019.

  • Tablet published Mike Dunphy's article "The Symphony at Terezín," about a concert comprised entirely of pieces composed by prisoners of the Holocaust.

  • "After all, we are animals who have only just begun to remove ourselves from the meat grinder of natural selection, and it shows." Robert Repino talks to My Life My Books My Escape about how '80s pop culture influenced the themes of war, survival, and morality in his new novel D'Arc.

  • The New York Post named Ashley Shelby's forthcoming novel South Pole Station one of its Best Books of the Summer.

  • Electric Literature published Seth Fried's short story "The Adventure of the Space Traveler" in its Recommended Reading magazine.

  • The New York Times published a feature on Weike Wang and her new novel in "Chemistry Is an Anti-Coming-of-Age Story," and NPR's Scott Simon interviewed her for Weekend Edition's segment "Chemistry Is About a Scientist Whose Plans Get Reconstituted."  

  • Laura Yeager is blogging for PsychCentral. Recent posts include "How to Do Well in College from a Professor's Perspective," "New Experiences Can Enrich Your Life," and "The Importance of Finding Your Happy Place."

  • Glamour published Lilly Dancyger's article "It's Time to Call San Bernardino's Deadly School Shooting What It Really Was: Domestic Violence."

June 2017

  • Chemical and Engineering News published a feature about Weike Wang and her new novel in "Chemistry, In a Book and a Board Game." Knopf released Weike's novel Chemistry in May.

  • Golf Digest published Peter Finch's article "Traveling With Sticks Is More Expensive Than Ever."

  • Military Review published Benjamin Buchholz's article "The Human Shield in Islamic Jurisprudence."

  • The first season of Tremontaine, co-authored by Paul Witcover, is out now from Saga Press/Simon & Schuster in hard cover. Tremontaine is a fantasy story published last year in installments by Serial Box.

  • "On the cold rainy night that Billy Sinclair attempted his first armed robbery, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in 1965, he was just another abused, reckless 20-year-old punk," writes Cullen Thomas for the Rumpus, the latest in his Conversations With Literary Ex-Cons series.

  • HBS Author's Spotlight interviewed Susan Breen about her novels, her classes, and why she's so good at Twitter.

  • Redbook published Melissa Petro's article "Four Women Get Really Honest About Becoming Moms After Working in the Sex Industry."

  • Stacy Parker Le Melle interviewed poet Terry Blackhawk, founder of the InsideOut Literary Arts Project in Detroit, about writing, pronouns, and how everyone, especially writers and artists, "function at our best when we are all pulling together" for First Person Plural.

  • Ken Derry's short story "As the Turtles Do" was short-listed for the American Short Fiction Prize.

  • Psychology Today published "Dance With a Demon," an excerpt of Lilly Dancyger's memoir, forthcoming in 2018.

  • The Trek included Aspen Matis' memoir The Girl in the Woods on its list of recommended books on hiking and nature "Written By Women."

  • Publishers Weekly reviewed Ashley Shelby's novel South Pole Station, calling it a "fascinating and (literally) chilling story." Picador will release the book in July.

  • Mike Dunphy wrote "Stopping to Smell the Rosewood Hotel in London" for Hotel Scoop.

  • The Satirist published Jon Reiner's essay "Mike Pence, Man of Passion."

  • The Thoughtful Dog interviewed David Rice about reading, writing, and creating a "necropolis of discarded ideas" for the title town of his new novel A Room in Dodge City.

  • Glamour published Lilly Dancyger's essay "Bill O'Reilly, Dr. Luke, and the End of Impunity for Powerful Men."

  • Fiction Advocate named Robert Repino's novel D'arc to its monthly list What To Read.

  • Nora Raleigh Baskin's essay "Helen Keller, Annie Sullivan, Mr. Thomsen, and Me" appears in Voices from the Middle, a publication of the National Council of Teachers of English.

  • Zaina Arafat reviews I'd Die For You, the newly released collection of lost F. Scott Fitzgerald stories, in "F. Scott Fitzgerald Will Never Die" for Vice.

  • BookBub named Domenica Ruta's memoir With or Without You one of its "Books to Read If You Love The Glass Castle."

  • Black Warrior Review published T. Kira Madden's essay "Cousin Cindy" in its spring issue.

  • Cure Today published Laura Yeager's essay "On Losing My Nipples."

  • 702WI interviewed Ashley Shelby about her favorite books, her favorite writers, and the stories that inspire her most.

  • The Establishment interviewed Kody Keplinger and David Yoo about the sex scenes in their YA novels for "Why the Young Adult Fiction Sexual Revolution Is So Necessary." Says Kody: "I wanted to write a story where a girl had sex, and it wasn't this huge catastrophe, this big deal that the whole book led up to."

  • "The weighty, Baroque Austro-Hungarian architecture of Zagreb may seem to better fit a dense, frothy beer, but Croatia’s alcoholic ace card still remains the wine," writes Mike Dunphy in a tour of Zagreb's wine bars for Travelmag.

  • Scott Alexander Hess talked "writing, beauty, and controllably losing your mind" with novelist David Jolly, author of Where All Light Tends to Go, for the Huffington Post.

  • "The best kind of gardening, my kind, is profuse, joyful, and filthy. It is the apple seed that grows without permission in the compost bin," writes N. West Moss, for Gravel magazine.