Faculty News

If you are a student with publication/production news for us, send the info to Dana Miller, dana at gothamwriters dot com.

October 2020

  • Business Insider published Melissa Petro's article "Why His-And-Hers Chores Don't Work." 

  • Angie Chatman traces the fraught relationship between Black Americans and the banking industry to the promise, frauds, and ultimate collapse of Freedman's Bank, in an article for Business Insider

  • Love's Executive Order published Matthew Lippman's poem "It's the Best America We've Got." 

  • Nelsie Spencer's one-woman show Day of the Dead Daddy will be staged by the Marsh Theater in San Francisco as part of the MarshStream 2020 International Solo Fest. 

  • An excerpt of Scott Alexander Hess' novel The Root of Everything appears in Words After Dark: A Lit, Lyrics, and Liquor Anthology

  • Erin Entrada Kelly appeared on the Newbery Tart podcast to talk about the challenge of writing YA heroines who  "don't get up to shenanigans." 

  • "COVID-19 is doing a number on our brain," writes Laura Yeager for PsychCentral.

  • The Believer published Teresa Wong's comic "This Is Not a Feel-Good Movie." 

  • NBC News THINK published Rachel Simon's essay on why Schitt's Creek deserved all of its Emmy awards, and the particular joy of watching underdogs win

  • Kristin Rockaway and her latest novel, She's Faking It, are featured in a roundup in Publishers Weekly, of 2020 authors finding creative new ways to connect with readers. 

  • War on the Rocks published Dewaine Farria's essay "Despite the Yoke." 

  • The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reviewed Tom Cooper's latest novel Florida Man, calling it fresh and surprising, and saying that in "capturing how development erased much of the state’s oddball authenticity...Cooper shows nostalgia for “Old Florida” without being sentimental about, say, roadside zoos packed with miserable animals."

  • "I have a shelf in my office that holds copies of all my work that has appeared in print: my novels, magazines, short story anthologies, and my poetry chapbook. Whenever I get discouraged about my writing career, I look at that shelf. It reminds me that I can do this," says Kirsten Imani Kasai in a featured interview with Shoutout SoCal.

  • The Massachusetts Review published Alanna Schubach's short story "Iris."

  • Lara Ewen's article "Virus-Responsive Design," about libraries redesigning themselves to simultaneously socially-distance patrons and make them more digitally connected than ever, appears in American Libraries magazine. 

  • Hasty Book List interviewed Jessica Sticklor about writing her new novel, how she became a writer in the first place, and the literary character she thinks she's most likely to be friends with

  • Female film critics make up only 35 percent of all reviewers, they review twice as many women-directed films as male critics, and they receive exponentially more online harassment—Mara Reinstein and fellow critic Christy Lemire talked about all that and more on the podcast Rachel's Reviews

  • Publishers Weekly gave Michael Montlack's new poetry collection Daddy a starred review, calling it "rewarding and accomplished." 

September 2020

  • Jessica Sticklor suggests three ways you can get to know your characters better in her article "How to Create Complex, Dynamic Characters in Fiction," up now at The Writer magazine. 

  •  "We All Need a Personal Cheerleader Right Now," Mara Reinstein's essay about running with her 12-year-old nephew, is up now at Runner's World.

  • Blaise Kearsley is now a contributing editor at the Vestal Review

  • Angie Chatman, with co-author Joanne Lozar Glenn, won a 2020 Apex Grand Award for Excellence in Writing, for an article published by the National Business Education Association

  • Kate Angus' poem "The Plants Are Happy" appears in the literary journal Room: A Sketchbook for Analytic Action

  • The New York Times included Edward Einhorn's plays The God Projekt and Performance for One in its roundup of live performances streaming online in "Appointment Theater, Now Coming to a Screen Near You." 

  • NYQ Books will release Michael Montlack's poetry collection Daddy on September 7th. 

  • Thrillist named Tom Cooper's new novel Florida Man to its list of Books We're Excited to Read, calling it "an off-kilter noir." 

  • "For years, the traditional reading has been that we’ve given too much power to the crowds, but no one considers the far more dangerous implication—that we sure are handing over a lot of undue power to corporations," writes Jon Gingerich in his op-ed "Companies Should Stand Up to Cancel Culture" for O'Dwyer's magazine. 

  • Barbara DeMarco-Barrett's short story "Pool Fishing" is included in the new anthology Crossing Borders, jointly published by Down & Out Books and Sisters In Crime-San Diego. 

  • In response to a photo that went viral recently, Carmen Bugan published her poem "Do Not Point Your Gun at a Child." 

August 2020

  • Madeline Valentine's picture book I Want That Nut! is a winner of the 2020 Praire Bud Awards, sponsored by the South Dakota Library Association. The award is selected by South Dakota readers in kindergarten through second grade, who vote for a book after they have read it. 

  • "Sometimes the connection on Zoom or WhatsApp becomes blurry and I have this strange sense that we are losing each other in the ether," writes Carmen Bugan in her essay "Stony Brook," for the Harvard Review.

  • The Horn Book named Erin Entrada Kelly's middle-grade novel Lalani and the Distant Sea one of its 2020 Mind the Gap Award winners, for excellent children's literature overlooked by the American Library Association Awards. 

  • Random House released Tom Cooper's novel Florida Man on July 28th. 

  • The Center for Fiction named Chelsea Bieker's novel Godshot to the longlist for the 2020 First Novel Prize.  

  • Clemintine Guirado's short story "Reliable Witness" is a finalist for the Master's Review Fall Fiction Prize. 

  • Rachel Simon tried Kim Kardashian's new loungewear collection and wrote about wanting "to live in these clothes forever," for HelloGiggles

  • Melissa Petro's article "I Found My Flow Working From Home in the Pandemic" is up now at Businss Insider

  • Architectural Digest published Mara Reinstein's article "Creating the Strange World of Eurovision for Netflix's New Hit Comedy." 

  • Aubrey Poole is the new acquisitions editor for the book-subscription service Literati

  • Scott Alexander Hess launched his new Hot Lit newsletter in July, featuring an interview with author Sarah Gerard. 

  • Tor Books announced it will publish Jennifer Marie Brissett's novel Destroyer of Light in fall 2021.  

  • Cure Today published Laura Yeager's article "There Are No Hugs with Telehealth."

  • Elle magazine named Lev A.C. Rosen's new YA novel Camp one of its Best Books of 2020 (So Far)

July 2020

  • The New York Times published Rachel Simon's article "Is Pickleball the Perfect Pandemic Pastime?" in its Sunday Styles section. 

  • The Missouri Review published Seth Fried's short story "Trezzo," which also won the magazine's 2020 Editor's Prize. 

  • Melissa Petro's essay "I'm a Recovering Alcoholic and My Husband Loves Beer. Here's How We Are Making It Work" is in Business Insider

  • The blog of the National Research Center for Parents with Disabilities at Brandeis University published Laura Yeager's "Bipolar Mother Makes the Best of It During COVID-19." 

  • The arts magazine Monk published Carmen Bugan's essay "Lumina Mea." 

  • NBC's Today show named books by two Gotham instructors to its list of Best Summer Reads for Kids: Erin Entrada Kelly's middle grade novel We Dream of Space and Lev A.C. Rosen's YA novel Camp.   

  • Business Insider published Angie Chatman's essay "Redlining May Be 'Officially' Over, But I Know All Too Well That Black Families Still Face Housing Discrimination."  

  • The Body published Anni Irish's article "How America's Longest Continuously Operating Bar for Queer Women is Fighting to Keep Its Doors Open." 

  • Thomas + Mercer has released Carole Bugge's novel Edinburgh Midnight, the third in her Ian Hamilton Mysteries series. 

  • Stowe Story Labs selected two Gotham instructors for its 2020 Workshop program: Tatjana Soli for the limited series adaptation of her novel The Removes, and C.C. Webster for her feature screenplay Little Buffalo.  

  • Laura Yeager is blogging for Pysch Central, and one of her most recent posts is "COVID-19 and Autistic Children."

  • Seventeen magazine's "Twelve Most Anticipated YA Books Coming Out Summer 2020" includes Lev A.C. Rosen's forthcoming novel Camp.  

June 2020

  • Pendemic published Jon Reiner's essay "Synchronicity." 

  • "In 1984, we had everything and still wanted more...You can see how that fits into now." Wonder Woman star Gal Gadot talks to Mara Reinstein about how the '80s are still relevant, if the fashions are not, for Parade magazine. 

  • "I'm Struggling Because of the Coronavirus. Why Won't My Landlord Lower the Rent?" Alanna Schubach's answer involves Albany, negotiation tactics, and collusion, for Brick Underground

  • Divya Sood's novel Find Someone to Love is a finalist for the Golden Crown Award in the General Fiction category.

  • Magnet Box Films has optioned C.C. Webster's screenplay Blue Ball, PA.  

  • Scholastic released Kody Keplinger's latest middle-grade novel Lila and Hadley

  • Michael Montlack's poems "One Sparrow" and "Green Beans and Mashed Potatoes" appear in the literary journal The Offing.

  • Bookshop featured Kirsten Imani Kasai's novel House of Erzulie on its "Dark and Delicious Reads by Women of Color" quarantine reading list.

  • Pleiades: Literature In Context reviewed Nina Boutsikaris' memoir I'm Trying To Tell You I'm Sorry, calling Nina and her book, variously, "a sieve," "a performance," and "a flytrap," but we're pretty sure in a good way.  

  • Rachel Simon's essay "Rodham Is a Frustrating but Fascinating Look at an Alternate-Universe Hillary Clinton" is up now at Marie Claire

  • Lara Ewen's article "A Civilized Term for Hate Crime," about librarians fighting back against Zoombombing and its chilling effect on free speech and assembly, appears in American Libraries magazine. 

  • HBO Max has optioned Lev A.C. Rosen's new YA novel Camp for production as a feature film. Little Brown Books for Young Readers released Camp on May 26th

  • Writers Weekly published Laura Yeager's article "Increase Your Freelance Writing Income with Your Own 'Editing Group.' "

  • Seth Fried and graphic designer Julia Mehoke, who is also Seth's wife, have launched the podcast Running Out of Movies, in which they discuss quarantining in a studio apartment with nothing good to watch. 

  • To mark the end of its 40th season and the approach of its 20th anniversary, Mara Reinstein collected the 100 Most Iconic Moments of Survivor, for The Ringer.  

  • Business Insider published Melissa Petro's article "Couples Are Fighting More During Quarantine, but my Husband and I Have Used the Time to Get Better at Handling Conflict."

  • "I don't know when the beige began," begins Jennifer Marie Brissett's short-story "Through the Veil," in Uncanny: A Magazine of Science Fiction and Fantasy. 

  •  WOW—Women on Writing published Laura Yeager's essay "The Coronavirus Coffee Kit.

  • The New York Times published Joselin Linder's essay "Dancing With My Mortality." 

  • The Paris Review pubished Chelsea Bieker's essay "Fathers Sway Above It All."

May 2020

  • Nina Boutsikaris' memoir I'm Trying to Tell You I'm Sorry is a small-press top 10 bestseller for the first quarter of 2020. 

  • Window shades, video games, and co-working spaces, and "other recent Lobbying Disclosure Act Database filings suggest that what constitutes an 'essential' business is, for better or worse, open to interpretation." Jon Gingerich does a deep dive into the industries trying to persaude the federal government that they're essential during the coronavirus outbreak, for O'Dwyers

  • Pulp magazine published Elane Johnson's essay "50, And a Reluctant Porn Star." 

  • For Parade magazine, Mara Reinstein interviewed actors Matthew Broderick and Sarah Jessica Parker about marriage, Broadway, and co-starring in the (postponed) Broadway revival of Plaza Suite.

  • It Gets Better featured Lev A.C. Rosen's short story "On the Corner of Iris and Hartz" in its Moments of Joy series. 

  • D.X. Varos announced it will release Jessica Sticklor's middle grade fantasy novel Nod on June 2nd. 

  • Chelsea Bieker's essay "Motherloss, That Thing You Cannot Escape" is up now at Literary Hub

  • Lara Ewen's article "How to Sanitize Collections in a Pandemic," in American Libraries magazine, has advice for librarians and non-librarians alike. 

  • The Internet Void published Jennifer Marie Brissett's poem "Remember." 

  • Joselin Linder appeared on The Dr. Oz Show to discuss her memoir The Family Gene and taking action against diseases. 

April 2020

March 2020

  • Library Journal gave a starred review to Chelsea Bieker's forthcoming novel Godshot, saying protagonist "Lacey May's is an irresistible voice, part gullible believer, part whip-smart independent spirit who surprises at every turn."

  • Rolling Stone published Melissa Petro's op-ed "Michael Bloomberg Wants to Silence Those Who Discuss Their Past — Including Me.

  • NYQ Books will publish Michael Montlack's poetry collection Daddy in April. 

  • Carment Bugan has been shortlisted for the International Beverly Prize for Literature for her memoir Life Without a Country.

  • "Surrender," an essay by Nina Boutsikaris, is a Sunday Short Read selected by Creative Nonfiction

  • The New York Times published Rachel Simon's essay "My Mom, My Dad and Amazon's Alexa" in its Ties column. 

  • Laura Yeager's essay "Leaving New York" appears in WOW! Women on Writing, as part of its Friday Speak Out series.

  • DC Comics has released Matthew Cody's graphic middle-grade novel Zantanna and the House of Secrets

  • Robert Repino talked about the Democratic Presidential primaries on the podcast The Devil Advocates

  • The Newslette interviewed Amina Akhtar as one of the "women we admire" for its article "We Found Love: How to Make the First Move in Career, Romance, Friendships." 

  • Lara Ewen looks at what's behind (and ahead for) NYC's many vacant storefronts in her aricle "How Chain Stores Are Rightsizing New York City Retail" for Retail Dive.  

  • Kirkus reviewed Lev A.C. Rosen's forthcoming middle-grade novel Camp, saying "This novel has the appeal of a rom-com movie-makeover but with more substantive explorations of self-betrayal, self-evaluation, and eventual awakening."

  • Print Club Ltd. published Anni Irish's article "Four Shows To See In New York City This Winter." 

  • Alanna Schubach's short-story "Next Door" appears in the current issue of Juked, a literary magazine. 

  • Seth Fried won the Missouri Review Editors' Prize for his short story "Trezzo."

  • "When my father was taken to prison for his public protest against Ceausescu in 1983, I wrote poems to his pictures...He 'came back' in my descriptions, and I articulated a sense of grief and loss for my mother and sister, too. This is how I knew that there was something special about writing." Carmen Bugan talks more about the transcendant power of writing in an interview with Pulp

February 2020

  • Columbia Journal published Kate Angus' poems "Tell Me About Last Night" and "Thirteen Years and This Is What You Are to Me Now.

  • The Millions' list of Most Anticipated Books for the first half of 2020 includes two novels by Gotham instructors: God Shot by Chelsea Bieker, forthcoming in April, and You Exist Too Much by Zaina Arafat, forthcoming in June. 

  • Michael Montlack's poem "A Friend of Farrah" appears in the Ocean State Review

  • Elemental magazine published Melissa Petro's article "Short-Term Abandonment of Your Loved Ones May Help Your Mental Health." 

  • "Servant of the People hits close to the bone at times, but offers a ray of hope too, packaged in smooth production, tight writing, fine performances, and laugh-out-loud sequences," writes Jennifer Keishin Armstrong, of the Ukranian TV show that starred that nation's current president Volodymyr Zelensky, for the BBC

  • Kody Keplinger talked about Dungeons & Dragons and body positivity on the podcast Dyking Out with Carolyn Bergier

  • Carmen Bugan and her memoir Life Without a Country have been longlisted for the International Beverly Prize for Literature

  • Publishers Weekly interviews Robert Repino about his forthcoming middle-grade novel Spark and the League of Ursus, and how he was inspired by his favorite childhood movies in the podcast PW KidsCast

  • Laura Yeager is blogging for Cure Today. Her most recent post is "The Gift of the Paper Fan."

  • When Lev Rosen got the idea for his forthcoming novel, he wanted to write "a contemporary queer YA version of a 1960s Doris Day/Rock Hudson sex comedy." He explains how that idea evolved into Camp, (releasing in May), in this interview with GeeksOUT.

  • Dave Hanson's play The Tenants has been accepted and will be staged at the New York Theater Festival's Winterfest

  • Gay Mag published Matt Jones' essay "Poses for the Beginning Figure Model.

  • Jessica Sticklor's YA fantasy novel Into the Fairy Forest (published under her author's name J.M. Stephen) was released on December 3rd by D.X. Varos

  • Anni Irish's article " 'Cruising Utopia' Ten Years Later: Revisiting Queer Scholar José Esteban Muñoz's Most Influential Work" appears in NewNowNext

January 2020

  • Book Riot recommends Amina Akhtar's novel Fashion Victim on its list of Mystery Book Recommendations Based on Films and TV Shows

  • Jon Gingerich's short story "Thornhope, Indiana" won the Saturday Evening Post's 2019 Great American Fiction Prize.

  • Sarah McColl wants you to "Stop Trying to Fight Your Chaos and Just Make Something." She's got suggestions for you on how, over at Forge magazine. 

  • Cullen Thomas visits Eastern State Penitentiary, America's most historic prison, with writer Samuel Barlow, who served time there, in his Conversations with Literary Ex-Cons series in The Rumpus.

  • Entropy magazine's list of the Best Nonfiction Books of 2019 includes two by Gotham instructors: I'm Trying to Tell You I'm Sorry by Nina Boutsikaris and Joy Enough by Sarah McColl. 

  • Bedazzled Ink Publishing has released Jessica Sticklor's novel The Beekeeper's Daughter (under her author's name Jessica Stilling). 

  • Electric Literature named Chelsea Bieker's forthcoming novel God Shot to its list of Most Anticipated Debuts of Early 2020. 

  • Lara Ewen looks at the ripple effects of the Walmart Disarmament in her article "What's Gained and Lost When Retailers Drop Firearms Sales," for Retail Dive

  • Anni Irish interviewed one of the doctors working to keep women alive in during and after labor and childbirth, in her article “In The Global Effort To Prevent Maternal Deaths, Doctors Without Borders Is LeadingThe Way,” for Elite Daily.

  • Liveright Publishing will release Sarah McColl's memoir Joy Enough in paperback on January 14th. 

  • Finally, an N&M Special, a sketch comedy show co-written by and co-starring Jim Mendrinos, is available now on Amazon Prime

  • "What I’ve learned for decades about communicating is that the most important part is trying to understand what’s going on in the other person’s mind in what they feel or think. If you don’t have some understanding, there’s no hope your point of view can ever get across," says actor Alan Alda in his interview with Mara Reinstein for Parade magazine.  

  • Longreads published Blaise Kearsley's essay "Why Mr. Bauer Didn't Like Me." 

  • Business Insider published Melissa Petro's essay "I Didn't Take Maternity Leave as a Self-Employed Worker, and I Regret It." 

  • Anni Irish wrote "Challenging Gender and Racial Stereotypes in the Legal Profession" for Fordham Law News

December 2019

  • Lara Ewen wrote the 2019 Holiday Gift Guide for Librarians and Book Lovers for American Libraries magazine. 

  • Lake Union Publishing announced it will publish Amy Sue Nathan's novel Well Behaved Wives, set in 1962 at a finishing school for homemakers. 

  • Bustle named Chelsea Bieker's forthcoming novel Godshot to its list of The 20 Must-Read Books of 2020, calling it the one "most likely to get you triple-digit likes on Instagram." 

  • Edward Einhorn directed the feature film The Last Cyclist, which will debut at the 2020 Boulder Film Festival

  • The picture book A Day for Skating, illustrated by Madeline Valentine, is out now from Candlewick Press

  • Set Designer Ethan Tobman needed to re-create high-security, off-limits federal spaces for the film The Report. Mara Reinstein interviews him on how he did it, for Architectural Digest

  • Kirkus reviewed Matthew Cody's forthcoming middle-grade graphic novel Zatanna and the House of Secrets, calling it "a page-turning emotional mystery." 

  • Inlandia: A Literary Journal published Barbara DeMarco-Barrett's essay "Dusk Therapy." 

  • Anni Irish interviewed WNBA star and guard for the Washington Mystics Natasha Cloud about her gun-reform activism and work for Everytown for Gun Safety in her article "Meet the Professional Athlete Who Is Standing Up to Gun Violence," for Bustle.

  • Tal McThenia's article "The Curious Case of Monte Carlo's Suspect 'Suicide Epidemic' " is up now at Atlas Obscura.

  • The Cortland Review published Michael Montlack's poem "Ghent Farm House (c. 1790),"  

  • Quirk Books will release Robert Repino's middle-grade novel Spark and the League of Ursus in April 2020. 

  • Amazon Prime is now airing Jacob, a documentary about Jacob Appel, (and featuring an interview with Gotham President Alex Steele). 

  • "When our 16-month-old stopped sleeping through the night, my marriage became a battleground." Melissa Petro writes about using emotional granularity to navigate and survive crisis, for Elemental

November 2019

  • Melissa Petro's essay "The Rescue Rooster Next Door" is up now at Tenderly.

  • Carmen Bugan's "New Life" is the poem of the week at the Poetry Centre at Oxford University-Brookes. 

  • Jennifer Keishin Armstrong's essay "A Lot of Old Sitcoms Don't Hold Up. The Mary Tyler Moore Show Does" is up at Buzzfeed.

  • The Best American Science and Nature Writing selected Matt Jones' essay "No Heart, No Moon" for its 2019 edition. 

  • Ashley Shelby's short story "The Ingenious Futility of Warblers" is featured in Audobon magazine's first-ever fiction issue. 

  • "Pressuring people to stay home, or invest in costly, lengthy journeys by rail or sea, is not how we ought to tackle the crisis of our warming planet," writes Alanna Schubach in her op-ed "Enough With the Flight Shaming Already!" for the Nation.

  • Catapault Books announced it will publish Shahnaz Habib's nonfiction travel book Airplane Mode in 2021. 

  • Joselin Linder and her memoir The Family Gene will be featured on CNN's Something's Killing Me in its November 3rd episode. 

  • Broadway World interviewed Edward Einhorn about Performance for One, the show written and directed by Edward where an actor performs for one audience member at a time, now running in Manhattan. 

  • Barbara DeMarco-Barrett's essay "Images of My Mother" appears in the current issue of the literary journal Belle Ombre.

  • Lion's Roar published Jennifer Keishin Armstrong's essay "How Mr. Rogers Taught Us to Love." 

  • Jody Gray is the co-creator, co-writer, co-lyricist, and composer for the animated children's series Fairy Tale Forest, now in production by M.Y.R.A Entertainment. 

  • Nina Boutsikaris' memoir I'm Trying To Tell You I'm Sorry is a small-press bestseller for the second quarter in a row. 

  • "To publish short nonfiction...you need only follow a few basic steps – and they’re the same steps whether you’re a seasoned professional or a total newbie," writes Melissa Petro in her article "Four Steps to Getting Published More," for The Writer magazine. 

  • Jacob Appel won the Pirate's Alley Faulkner Society Faulkner-Wisdom Award for best individual poem, for "Plea to Our Future Worst Selves on a Cold Winter Night."