Faculty News

If you are a student with publication/production news for us, send the info to Dana Miller, dana at gothamwriters dot com.

November 2022

  • "These little enclaves, where there was no dancing and no kissing and sirens blared outside, but where nonetheless there was hope," writes Lev AC Rosen about gay bars, film noir, and the fight for LGBTQ+ equality, in his essay "The Big Sleep and the Black Cat" for Crime Reads.

  • America's Next Great Author, a forthcoming reality show hosted by Kwame Alexander, selected Scott Alexander Hess as a semi-finalist contestant

  • Summou published Stephanie Nieves's essay "Therapy Diaries."

  • Shondaland published Rachel Simon's article "With Abbott Elementary, Writer Brittani Nichols Has Finally Found a Place for Her Voice." 

  • Book Riot included Alanna Schubach and her recently novel The Nobodies on its list of "Exciting Contemporary Books Looking at Jewish Life." 

  • Anni Irish covered the contract negotiations, worker strike, and union ratification by employees of the Philadelphia Museum of Art for the Art Newspaper

  • "There is no quick answer to how to be an artist. There is only being an artist," writes Angie Chatman in her essay "The Apprenticeship Model" for the Brevity Blog

  • December magazine published Michael Montlack's poems "Post Break-Up Saudade" and "Who Taught Casanova How to Flirt?" 

  • Brendan Halpin's YA horror novel Black Diamond is available now on Gumdrop

  • John Kachuba's middle-grade paranormal novel, "Haycorn Smith and the Castle Ghost," will be published in 2023 by Paper Angel Press.

  • Bloomsbury announced it will publish Rita Chang-Eppig's novel Deep as the Sky, Red as the Sea in June 2023. 

  • The Horn Book reviewed Erin Entrada Kelly's recently-released middle-grade novel Surely, Surely Marisol Rainey, calling it a "lively, realistic, and emotionally honest story."

  • Jon Reiner reviewed Tom Stoppard's latest Broadway play Leopoldstadt in "Vienna Waits for You." 

  • Josh Sippie's short story "Wingspan" will be included in the forthcoming anthology Negative Space Comics 2022

  • Scott Alexander Hess curated a list of "risk-taking, gorgeous LGBTQ novels" for Shepherd

  • Rachel Simon has advice for wedding guests who have no idea what to wear in her article "Decoding the Dress Code" for the New York Times.  

  • Cheap Pop published María Alejandra Barrios's flash fiction story "Adenium."

  • Little, Brown Books for Young Readers announced it will publish Lev AC Rosen's young adult novel Emmett, inspired by Jane Austen's Emma, in fall 2023. 

  • Carole Buggé and her latest novel Cleopatra's Dagger were the subject of a feature article in The Big Thrill.

October 2022

  • The Citron Review published María Alejandra Barrios's short story "Cotton." 

  • Literary Matters reviewed Carmen Bugan's essay collection Poetry and the Language of Oppression, calling it a "beautiful and intensely scrupulous book." 

  • "We never realized how successful the show was." Alan Alda talks to Mara Reinstein about M*A*S*H, its legacy, and where he was when the record-breaking final episode aired, for Parade magazine. 

  • Lev AC Rosen's forthcoming novel Lavender House (Forge Books, October 18th) has been named to several must-read lists for the fall, including BuzzFeed's "35 New Books You Won't Be Able to Put Down," Library Reads's "Top Ten New Books That Library Staff Love," Cosmopolitan's "Best Fall Books," and "October Top Ten Picks" at Loan Stars, which means it's a favorite of Canadian Librarians.

  • N. West Moss's essay "Goodbye, Columbus" is up now at Dorothy Parker's Ashes

  • Inside Edition interviewed Rachel Simon about her new nonfiction book Pickleball for All, (released August 30th by Harper Collins), how the sport got its name, and why, 50 years after its invention, it's surging in popularity now

  • Full Stop magazine interviewed Alanna Schubach about her new novel The Nobodies, and "magic, Long Island, and the hazy boundaries of the self.

  • The House of Mystery Radio on NBC podcast featured Scott Alexander Hess talking about the creative process that informed the mystery at the center of his novel Skyscraper

  • Irene Zabytko reviewed Love in Defiance of Pain: Ukrainian Stories, calling it an "outstanding and significant collection of fiction...not about the current war but that nevertheless exhibits Ukrainians confronting life and death, love and betrayal, war and peace" for World Literature Today

  • Andrew Collins recommended "Five Scenic Road Trips to Take in North America This Fall" for Forbes magazine. 

  • Dollar Store magazine published Josh Sippie's "Keanu Reeves, Living the Dream," an erasure poem from the song "Keanu Reeves" by Logic. 

  • "In any story, there is a center of moral good," writes Carole Buggé (under her author's name Carole Lawrence) in her article "The Moral Universe" for Writer's Digest.

September 2022

  • Edward Einhorn's The Neurology of the Soul is the Featured Play of the Day at the National New Play Exchange.

  • Angie Chatman's essay about love, grief, and Frango mints, "The Bitter and the Sweet," is up now at Taint Taint Taint Magazine

  • Hardie Grant Books published Andrew Collins's travel guide Ultimate Road Trips: USA & Canada

  • Turner Publishing released Jon Gingerich's debut novel The Appetite Factory on August 23rd. 

  • "Sometimes I think if I wasn't a writer, I'd be a travel agent." Kristin Rockaway writes for Fresh Fiction about  sending her characters all over the world in her novels, and why she sent the protagonist of her latest novel Smart Girl Summer on a six-week cruise around the Mediterranean.

  • The Saturday Evening Post published N. West Moss's essay "The Era of Zonker." 

  • Erin Entrada Kelly wrote "A Message to My Younger Self" for School Library Journal

  • Alta published Rita Chang-Eppig's essay "Arrivals and Departures: Exploring a Replica Junk Ship Connects Past to Present." 

  • "You can learn a lot from slang," write Josh Sippie in his essay "The Very Proper Reason the British Library Has a Vulgar Dictionary" for Atlas Obscura

  • "I really tried to keep things lively—move forward, go a little back, go for a little swim, maul a cake." Arlaina Tibensky talks about writing her short story "The Pelican," and flash fiction in general, with Smokelong Quarterly.

  • McSweeney's published Teresa Wong's comic "Safety Net."

  • Susan Breen wrote "The Best Books About Second Chances, From an Author Who's on Her Fifth Chance (and Teetering on Her Sixth)" for Shepherd

  • Business Insider published Melissa Petro's essay "I Was Skeptical About My Son's Waldorf School. Turns Out, We Both Love It."

  • Carole Buggé (using her author name Carole Lawrence) wrote "Books to Understand Gilded-Age New York City" for Crime Reads.

August 2022

  • Pulse Ensemble Theatre will stage Carole Bugge's physics play Strings Attached, opening August 28th through October 1st, on NYC's Theatre Row.  

  • Rachel Simon's nonfiction book Pickleball for All: Everything But the "Kitchen" Sink will be released on August 29th by Harper Collins/Dey Street Books. 

  • Flux published Robert Repino's op-ed "The January 6th Hearings Demonstrate How to Move Forward When Dialogue Is Impossible." 

  • DX Varos Publishing released Jessica Sticklor's novel The Rise of Runes and Shields, the first book in a new fantasy young-adult series, the Seidr Sagas, (published under her author name J.M. Stephen). 

  • Cure Today published Laura Yeager's "I Feel Empathy for Those Who Are Abandoned During Cancer."

  • Fran McNulty's collection Weight took first-runner up in the Jonathan Holden Poetry Chapbook Contest and has been published by Choeofpleirn Press

  • For magazine, Rachel Simon interviewed Olivia Newman, director of the film Where the Crawdads Sing, about adapting the lyricism of the novel to the screen.

  • Opera America staged a workshop of The Life and Adventures of Santa Claus, with libretto by Edward Einhorn. 

  • Amina Akhtar's novel Kismet, released by Thomas + Mercer on August 1st, is an Amazon's First Reads

  • The Millions interviewed Alanna Schubach about female friendships, magic realism, and her new novel The Nobodies

  • Melissa Petro's essay "(Sex) Work" is included in the anthology Women Talk Money: Breaking the Taboo, out now from Simon & Schuster

  • The Rumpus published Amanda Oliver's essay "Honey."

  • "It's perfect summer reading," says Publishers Weekly in its review of Kristin Rockaway's novel Smart Girl Summer, to be published this month by Montlake. 

  • Pidgeonholes published María Alejandra Barrios's short story "Periquito." 

  • Fran McNulty's poem "The Exterminator" appears in Coneflower Cafe.

July 2022

  • Smokelong Quarterly published Arlaina Tibensky's flash story "The Pelican."

  • María Alejandra Barrios's story "Things Never Stay Warm," originally published in Fractured Lit, made the 2022 Wigleaf Top 50 Very Short Fictions list.

  • Abandoned Mine published Fran McNulty's poem "Firing Squad." 

  • Livina Press published N. West Moss's essay "The Rip Van Winkle Bridge." 

  • James Preller's novel Fairy House, a choose-your-own-adventure story, is out now from Chooseco

  • Carole Buggé appeared on the Author2Author podcast, hosted by Bill Kenower, to talk about her latest novel, and also about writing sketch comedy about her parents as a kid, befriending the guy on her college campus who refused to wear shoes in the winter, and learning about being an author by writing literary criticism.

  • The How Writers Write podcast featured Carole Buggé (under her author's name Carole Lawrence) talking about the creative process and why she makes her novel-writing students try their hands at poetry.  

  • Gizmodo included Alanna Schubach's new novel The Nobodies on its list of Sci-Fi, Fantasy, and Horror Books for Your Summer Reading Pleasure

  • Amina Akhtar talked about her writing practice, her forthcoming novel Kismet, and V.C. Andrews with Advice To Writers

  • Kristin Rockaway's forthcoming novel Smart Girl Summer is included on Fortune's list of Page-Turning Books You Should Read This Summer

  • Fifty-Word Stories published N. West Moss's "Murmurings."

  • Teresa Wong's essay "Screaming and Watercolours" is included in the anthology Good Mom on Paper, released last month by Book*hug Press.

  • Contrary magazine published three of Fran McNulty's poems: "Mania," "On Memorizing Ode on a Grecian Urn," and "Departure." 

June 2022

  • For Salon, Julie Powell recapped The Julia Child Challenge, a show she called "very silly and goodhearted that made me roll my eyes and spring tears in roughly equal measure." Her final installments included "I Can Hear Julia Child's Voice in my Head Again" and "Omelets Are Hard to Master."

  • Rachel Simon's essay "I'm an Abortion Clinic Escort. Here's How Things Have Changed Since the Roe Leak" is up now at NBC Think. 

  • Parade magazine published Mara Reinstein's article "21 Things You Might Not Know About E.T. to Celebrate the Movie's 40th Anniversary."

  • Them published Stephanie Nieves's article "The Ultimate Guide on How to Sext.

  • Roller skates, gardening time, self-care indulgences, and noodles — Melissa Petro asked moms what they really want for Mother's Day, for Insider.

  • Roundfire Books will release David Berner's novel Sandman: A Golf Tale on July 22nd. 

  • "If you don't think Nature is sexually charged, stand next to my pear tree. You can hear the white blossoms open themselves wide and whisper throatily to each fat bee that zig-zags past, 'Pick me, pick me.' " N. West Moss wrote about "Chaos in the Garden," for the Saturday Evening Post

  • Lara Ewen wrote about public libraries fighting to improve menstrual equity for American Libraries magazine, in her article "Period. End of Story." 

  • Edward Einhorn adapted the classic Greek tragedy Iphigenia into a new graphic novel Iphigenia in Aulis, just released by Image Comics.

  • Best Small Fictions selected not one but two flash stories by María Alejandra Barrios for its 2022 anthology:  "Pimento Season" and "Things Never Stay Warm." 

  • "Memento Mori" by Fran McNulty won the Martha's Vineyard Poet Laureate's 2022 Poetry Competition.

  • The Walrus published Teresa Wong's essay "Screaming and Watercolours: I Turned My Toddler's Tantrums Into Art." 

  • Arlaina Tibensky wrote about her late mother's frog problem for the New York Times

  • Tor.com published Robert Repino's essay "Six Made-For-TV SFF Films That Actually Exist."

  • Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine published Susan Breen's short story "A Tourist Dies in the Tower." 

  • Rachel Simon made her debut as a crossword constructor for the New York Times, which may or may not feature clues about Rick Astley. 

  • Now and Forever,  the second novel in Angela Lam's Women of the Crush trilogy, will be released August 17th by The Wild Rose Press.

  • "Advice to copy editors at the Boston Globe: Never write 'the person died unexpectedly.' Everyone dies unexpectedly," writes Fran McNulty in her poem "Everyone Dies," for the Jewish Literary Journal.

  • Women on Writing published Laura Yeager's "On Being a Cancer Blogger" on their blog, The Muffin.

May 2022

April 2022

March 2022

  • Mystery Writers of America selected Susan Breen's short story "Banana Island" for its anthology Crime Hits Home, forthcoming in March from Hanover Square Press. 

  • Jennifer Gennari's middle-grade novel Muffled is a finalist for the Georgia Children's Book Award

  • Out There podcast featured Angie Chatman telling her story "Pandemic Sundays" about the life-changing experience of walking through Boston with a friend every weekend. 

  • The Margins published Roohi Choudhry's flash fiction story "Five Scents." 

  • Janine Annett tried several at-home seltzer makers and ranked them for us, with extra attention to fizziness, for the Wall Street Journal

  • Jody Gray served as Music Director and composer for two animated series recently returned to television: Space Racers on Amazon Prime and Courage the Cowardly Dog now streaming on HBO Max

  • Melissa Petro wrote "Three New York Teachers on the Endless Heartbreak and Stress of COVID-19" for Business Insider

  • Locus magazine published a rave review of Jennifer Marie Brissett's latest novel Destroyer of Light, saying it's "the story the 21st century needs." 

  • Publishers Weekly gave Carole Buggé's forthcoming mystery novel Cleoptra's Dagger a starred review, calling it an "excellent whodunit," with a heroine whose "sleuthing never strains credulity." 

  • Angela Lam talks about senior softball, writing outside your comfort zone, and why you should "respect the need to lay fallow between big projects," in an interview with Awesome Gang.

  • Michael Montlack won the 2022 Saints and Sinners Poetry Award for his poem "Phantom Rain." 

  • Harper Collins/Dey Street Books announced it will publish Rachel Simon's narrative nonfiction book Pickleball for All: Everything But the "Kitchen" Sink this August.

  • Teresa Wong's comic "Oh No, Have I Killed It?" is included in the anthology EVENT, 50 Years: Collected Notes On Writing

  • Jennifer Marie Brissett has a short story in the forthcoming science fiction anthology Terraform: Watch/Worlds/Burn, to be published in August by Macmillan.

  • Shearsman Books will release Carmen Bugan's poetry collection Time Being later this month. 

  • Tor.com previewed Lev A.C. Rosen's latest novel Lavender House, complete with cover reveal. Lev's mystery is forthcoming in October from Forge Books. 

  • N. West Moss's flash fiction "A Man (Not Her Husband)" won 50-Word Story's 2021 Story of the Year prize. 

  • Cure Today published Laura Yeager's "Goodbye Cancer Displeasure, Hello Sexual Pleasure."

  • No Dear magazine published María Alejandra Barrios's poem "Phantom Li/mb."

February 2022

  • Janine Annett tweeted about Cry January instead of Dry January, and it blew up. Her essay "Why My Viral 'Cry January' Tweet Resonated Resonated With So Many Parents" examines the various ways it struck a nerve, for Parents magazine. 

  • Wild Rose Press will release Angela Lam's novel Love Again, the first book in the new series Women of the Crush, on February 28th. 

  • National Catholic Reporter published Laura Yeager's essay "Confirming My Son During the COVID-19 Pandemic.

  • Anni Irish wrote "Employees at New York City's Jewish Museum Vote to Unionize" for the Art Newspaper.

  • Kirkus reviewed Carole Buggé's mystery novel Cleopatra's Dagger (forthcoming from Thomas & Mercer under her author's name Carole Lawrence), saying "the complex, intrepid feminist heroine bodes well for future insallments." 

  • This Week In New York named Alma Baya, written and directed by Edward Einhorn, the Best Futuristic Play in its Pandemic Awards, "celebrating the amazing innovation and creativity in dance, film, theater, food, opera, art, literature, music, and other entertainment since March 2020."

  • "It was beautiful here, even if it was trying to kill her." N. West Moss's comic short story "Peat Fires" is up now at Miniskirt Magazine

  • Crime Reads named Amina Akhtar's novel Kismet (forthcoming in July from Thomas + Mercer) to its list of Most Anticipated Crime Fiction of 2022

  • Barbara DeMarco-Barrett's short story "Blue Martini" is selected for the anthology Coolest American Stories 2022

  • The Rumpus named Alysia Li Ying Sawchyn its new Editor-In-Chief. 

  • Rachel Simon wrote "When To Stop Therapy" for Teen Vogue

  • Literary Hub named Amanda Oliver's forthcoming book Overdue: Reckoning With the Public Library to its list of Most Anticipated Books of 2022

  • The Art Newspaper published Anni Irish's article "Jeff Koons Accused of Appropriating Sculpture for 1989 Series Featuring His Ex-Wife."

  • Hobart Pulp published María Alejandra Barrios's short story "Anything But Tongue." 

January 2022

  • Syfy Wire featured Jennifer Marie Brissett and her new novel Destroyer of Light in its article "Bringing the Persephone Myth to Sci-Fi." 

  • The Desert Sun featured Barbara DeMarco-Barrett and her new anthology in its feature story "In Palm Springs Noir, Local Authors Contribute Ominous Desert Tales."

  • "Mixing elements of poetry with razor-sharp observations and omnivorous references, Tate helped create a new kind of criticism that profoundly changed the field from the inside out." Anni Irish remembers musician and writer Greg Tate, who died December 7th, for The Art Newspaper

  • Melissa Petro wrote "I Was Hit By a Car While Typing Emails on My Phone: It Made Me See My Relationship With Work Had to Change" for Business Insider.

  • CrimeReads interviewed Amina Akhtar about her forthcoming mystery novel Kismet, complete with cover reveal

  • Scott Alexander Hess's novellas Lightning and The Root of Everything were chosen by St. Louis librarians as among the Best Books of 2021

  • Jennifer Gennari's middle-grade novel Muffled is out now in paperback by Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers.

  • Shenandoah published Alanna Schubach's short story "Mr. Frog."

  • "Gene Wilder was introverted backstage. Carl Reiner was not." Mara Reinstein gets the good dish about the Broadway production of The Producers from actor Matthew Broderick, for Vulture.  

  • Tor published Robert Repino's essay "Beyond the Beatles: George Harrison's Unexpected Connections to Science Fiction and Fantasy." 

  • María Alejandra Barrios's flash fiction stories "Afterlife" and "Pimento Season" have been included in the anthology Moon City Review

  • W magazine published Rachel Simon's essay "The Final Season of Six Feet Under Will Bring You Back to Life."

  • The Chicago Public Library named Erin Entrada Kelly's novel Maybe Maybe Marisol Rainey to its 2021 list of Best Fiction for Younger Readers. 

  • Jennifer Marie Brissett's latest novel Destroyer of Light has been named to several Best Books of the 2021 lists, including Kirkus's Best Science Fiction and Fantasy, and Tor's Reviewers' Choice.

  • Laura Yeager is blogging for Cure Today. Her recent posts include "Why a Piece of Paper is a Cancer Survivor's Most Prized Possession."
  • Rachel Simon curated the best episodes of the TV comedy It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia, for Vulture

  • Litbreak magazine published Adela Brito's short story "Babalú Blessings." 

  • Shondaland published Rachel Simon's essay "When I Relearned to Drive, I Found Myself."

  • "That something happened to the church or the religion, rather than the church or the religion being responsible for what happened, is the overriding assumption of all such essays," writes Robert Repino in "So You Want to Write an Article Deflecting All Blame From Christianity: A Handy Guide" for Religion Dispatches

December 2021