Faculty News

July 2017

  • BBC Radio 4 named Carmen Bugan's memoir Burying the Typewriter its Book of the Week, and posted it as an audio series at BBC.com, available through August 9th. 

  • Jennifer Marie Brissett's short sci-fi story "The Executioner" appears in the new issue of Fantastic Stories

  • Jen Glantz appeared on NPR's Ask Me Another as the show's mystery guest, where the hosts tried to guess the job she works when she's not writing. (It's not her Gotham job either!) 

  • Little, Brown will publish Lev AC Rosen's latest novel Jack of Hearts (and Other Parts), a contemporary young adult story, in 2018. 

  • The Harvard Review published Carmen Bugan's "Fathers, Sons, and the Land in Between," a review of Hisham Matar's memoir The Return

  • Stephanie Paterik interviewed poet and memoirist Patricia Lockwood for AdWeek's "The Creative 100" issue. 

  • Kara Lee Corthron's play Welcome to Fear City premieres this summer at the Contemporary American Theatre Festival.

  • "This is how it was with the Great Disaster: Some people it shattered, and some people it made more themselves," writes Alanna Schubach in her short story "The Great Disaster" published in Recommended Reading

  • BoingBoing recommended Robert Repino's three-book War With No Name series in the article "Sentient Animals Rise Up and Defeat Humanity." SoHo Press released D'Arc, the most recent novel in the series, in May. 

  • Ashley Shelby wrote about the therapeutic benefits to writing about the things that make you angry in her essay "Indulge Your Climate Rage In Fantasy. It Helps" for Slate.

  • Melissa Petro's article "The Dos and Don'ts of Moving In With Your Significant Other" appears in Ravishly.

  • Black Lawrence Press will publish Nina Boutsikaris' memoir I'm Trying to Tell You I'm Sorry in 2019.

  • Tablet published Mike Dunphy's article "The Symphony at Terezín," about a concert comprised entirely of pieces composed by prisoners of the Holocaust.

  • "After all, we are animals who have only just begun to remove ourselves from the meat grinder of natural selection, and it shows." Robert Repino talks to My Life My Books My Escape about how '80s pop culture influenced the themes of war, survival, and morality in his new novel D'Arc.

  • The New York Post named Ashley Shelby's forthcoming novel South Pole Station one of its Best Books of the Summer.

  • Electric Literature published Seth Fried's short story "The Adventure of the Space Traveler" in its Recommended Reading magazine.

  • The New York Times published a feature on Weike Wang and her new novel in "Chemistry Is an Anti-Coming-of-Age Story," and NPR's Scott Simon interviewed her for Weekend Edition's segment "Chemistry Is About a Scientist Whose Plans Get Reconstituted."  

  • Laura Yeager is blogging for PsychCentral. Recent posts include "How to Do Well in College from a Professor's Perspective," "New Experiences Can Enrich Your Life," and "The Importance of Finding Your Happy Place."

  • Glamour published Lilly Dancyger's article "It's Time to Call San Bernardino's Deadly School Shooting What It Really Was: Domestic Violence."

June 2017

  • Chemical and Engineering News published a feature about Weike Wang and her new novel in "Chemistry, In a Book and a Board Game." Knopf released Weike's novel Chemistry in May.

  • Golf Digest published Peter Finch's article "Traveling With Sticks Is More Expensive Than Ever."

  • Military Review published Benjamin Buchholz's article "The Human Shield in Islamic Jurisprudence."

  • The first season of Tremontaine, co-authored by Paul Witcover, is out now from Saga Press/Simon & Schuster in hard cover. Tremontaine is a fantasy story published last year in installments by Serial Box.

  • "On the cold rainy night that Billy Sinclair attempted his first armed robbery, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in 1965, he was just another abused, reckless 20-year-old punk," writes Cullen Thomas for the Rumpus, the latest in his Conversations With Literary Ex-Cons series.

  • HBS Author's Spotlight interviewed Susan Breen about her novels, her classes, and why she's so good at Twitter.

  • Redbook published Melissa Petro's article "Four Women Get Really Honest About Becoming Moms After Working in the Sex Industry."

  • Stacy Parker Le Melle interviewed poet Terry Blackhawk, founder of the InsideOut Literary Arts Project in Detroit, about writing, pronouns, and how everyone, especially writers and artists, "function at our best when we are all pulling together" for First Person Plural.

  • Ken Derry's short story "As the Turtles Do" was short-listed for the American Short Fiction Prize.

  • Psychology Today published "Dance With a Demon," an excerpt of Lilly Dancyger's memoir, forthcoming in 2018.

  • The Trek included Aspen Matis' memoir The Girl in the Woods on its list of recommended books on hiking and nature "Written By Women."

  • Publishers Weekly reviewed Ashley Shelby's novel South Pole Station, calling it a "fascinating and (literally) chilling story." Picador will release the book in July.

  • Mike Dunphy wrote "Stopping to Smell the Rosewood Hotel in London" for Hotel Scoop.

  • The Satirist published Jon Reiner's essay "Mike Pence, Man of Passion."

  • The Thoughtful Dog interviewed David Rice about reading, writing, and creating a "necropolis of discarded ideas" for the title town of his new novel A Room in Dodge City.

  • Glamour published Lilly Dancyger's essay "Bill O'Reilly, Dr. Luke, and the End of Impunity for Powerful Men."

  • Fiction Advocate named Robert Repino's novel D'arc to its monthly list What To Read.

  • Nora Raleigh Baskin's essay "Helen Keller, Annie Sullivan, Mr. Thomsen, and Me" appears in Voices from the Middle, a publication of the National Council of Teachers of English.

  • Zaina Arafat reviews I'd Die For You, the newly released collection of lost F. Scott Fitzgerald stories, in "F. Scott Fitzgerald Will Never Die" for Vice.

  • BookBub named Domenica Ruta's memoir With or Without You one of its "Books to Read If You Love The Glass Castle."

  • Black Warrior Review published T. Kira Madden's essay "Cousin Cindy" in its spring issue.

  • Cure Today published Laura Yeager's essay "On Losing My Nipples."

  • 702WI interviewed Ashley Shelby about her favorite books, her favorite writers, and the stories that inspire her most.

  • The Establishment interviewed Kody Keplinger and David Yoo about the sex scenes in their YA novels for "Why the Young Adult Fiction Sexual Revolution Is So Necessary." Says Kody: "I wanted to write a story where a girl had sex, and it wasn't this huge catastrophe, this big deal that the whole book led up to."

  • "The weighty, Baroque Austro-Hungarian architecture of Zagreb may seem to better fit a dense, frothy beer, but Croatia’s alcoholic ace card still remains the wine," writes Mike Dunphy in a tour of Zagreb's wine bars for Travelmag.

  • Scott Alexander Hess talked "writing, beauty, and controllably losing your mind" with novelist David Jolly, author of Where All Light Tends to Go, for the Huffington Post.

  • "The best kind of gardening, my kind, is profuse, joyful, and filthy. It is the apple seed that grows without permission in the compost bin," writes N. West Moss, for Gravel magazine.

May 2017

  • The play The Marriage of Alice B. Toklas by Gertrude Stein, written and directed by Edward Einhorn, debuts this month at the HERE Arts Center in New York City.

  • Autism Parenting Magazine will publish Laura Yeager's poem "Mother of an Autistic Son" in its Mother's Day issue.

  • Longreads published Roohi Choudhry's essay "On Island: Journeying to Penal Colonies, from Rikers to Robben."

  • Mike Dunphy's essay "Prague: Sixteen Years Later" appears in Expats.

  • Soho Press releases Robert Repino's novel D'Arc, the third in his "War with No Name" series, on May 9th.

  • Publisher's Weekly reviewed Weike Wang's novel Chemistry, calling it "clipped, funny, and painfully honest." The book comes out from Knopf Publishing on May 23rd.

  • Greg Fallis writes about the controversy over the Charging Bull and Fearless Girl statues in lower Manhattan in "Seriously, the Guy Has a Point."

  • Kara Lee Corthron's new play Listen for the Light premiered at the Know Theatre of Cincinnati.

  • Kody Keplinger's essay "Feminist Songs to Sing Along To" appears in the anthology Here We Are: Feminism For the Real World, recently released by Algonquin Young Readers.

  • The Atlantic published Nan Mooney's article "Is This as Good as Childcare Gets?

  • Leapfrog Press releases N. West Moss' short-story collection The Subway Stops at Bryant Park on May 2.

  • Eclectica Magazine published Benjamin Buchholz's short story "Two Opinions on the Death of a Bird."

  • Alanna Schubach interviewed an undocumented immigrant about coming to the United States, how life has changed since the election, and whether sanctuary cities can really protect people, for Brick Underground.

  • Ashley Shelby is a finalist for Arcturus magazine's Al-Simāk Award for Fiction for her short story "A Honeymoon in Temporary Locations."
  • Out In Print reviewed Scott Alexander Hess' novel Skyscraper, calling it a "wonder of a book that packs a great deal into a small package."

  • Knopf Books for Young Readers released Matthew Cody's middle-grade novel The Magician's Key, book two in his Pied Piper series.

  • Melissa Petro wrote about meditating through pain in all its "different forms: The sting of the needle, the smack of the airbag, the snap of a breaking bone" for Headspace.

  • Glamour published Lilly Dancyger's article "Why Paid Menstrual Leave Might Not Be As Great as It Sounds."

  • Green Mountains Review published Sarah McColl's essay "Open House in Open Season."

  • Hasanthika Sirisena's short-story collection The Other One is "finely rendered...entertaining and exceptional," says the American Book Review.

  • Diana Spechler wrote "There's Only One Abortion Clinic Left In This State — And It's Not Texas" for Vice.

  • "The place we stand in our lives is in large part the product of the story that we tell ourselves about ourselves. And we have the power to revise these stories; we can find our words loosed from and thereby loosing us from the imposing grip of the past’s injustice and/or wrongness,” writes Aspen Matis for LitHub, as one of "Eleven Women Writers In Response to Bonnie Nadzam's Essay 'Experts in the Field."

  • The Inquisitive Eater named Kate Angus its Poet of the Month, and published several of her poems, including "Never In My Life."

  • "You know the shot. Name a film with a token hot chick that doesn't have a shot like this," writes Nina Boutsikaris in her essay "Marley Shelton as Wendy Pefferkorn in The Sandlot," for Goodnight Sweet Prince.

  • Fourth Graders voting on their favorite works of historical fiction included Nora Raleigh Baskin's middle-grade novel Nine, Ten: A September 11 Story.

  • "Rakia is divine," begins David Farley's article "The Balkan Spirit Having a Revolution," for the BBC.

  • Mike Dunphy lays out the case for visiting Bologna before any of Italy's other, more famous, cities, for Virtuoso.

  • "Written before the election but published after, Shadowbahn is hyper-aware of the ways in which America has not only been split into rival factions, but into mutually exclusive realities," writes David Rice of the new novel by Steve Erickson, for The Believer.

April 2017

  • "Live inside the work. That's the safest place I've found, and it's also my self care," T. Kira Madden says in a Q&A with the Black Warrior Review.

  • David Leo Rice's novel A Room In Dodge City is out now from Alternating Current Press.

  • J.S. Breukelaar's new horror novel Aletheia has been released by Crystal Lake Publishing.

  • Blaise Kearsley writes about the re-make of Lifetime cult classic Mother May I Sleep With Danger? in her "James Franco Remakes a Lifetime Movie, Adds Lesbian Vampires: Well, Why Not?" for Elle magazine.

  • Longreads published Amy Shearn's essay "A Heart-Shaped Life: 12 Ways of Looking at Amy Krouse Rosenthal."

  • Kirkus reviewed N. West Moss' forthcoming short-story collection The Subway Stops at Bryant Park, calling it "uniquely illuminating."

  • Scott Alexander Hess' novel Skyscraper is a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award in the LGBTQ Erotica category.

  • The BBC published Jennifer Keishin Armstrong's article "We Should Thank Buffy for Today's 'Golden Age' of Television."

  • "When Michael Jackson Needed a Guitar Solo, He Called The First Lady of Shred," writes Ian Port, of guitarist Jennifer Batten, for the Village Voice.

  • The Week published Melissa Petro's essay "I got an IUD. It was a nightmare."

  • Publishers Weekly gave Robert Repino's forthcoming novel D'Arc a starred review, calling it a "fantastic...unusual story about the power of myth, love, and redemption in a dangerous time."

  • Entertainment Weekly named Weike Wang's forthcoming novel Chemistry one of its "16 Debut Novels to Read in 2017."

  • The Opiate magazine published David Rice's short story "PornME."

  • McSweeney's published Sarah McColl's essay "Amazing Opportunities for Female Writers of Creative Nonfiction for Whom Traditional Employment Is Anathema."

  • Jim Mendrinos tells the story of the worst date he's ever had for the web series On This Date by New Media Comedy.

  • Stacy Parker Le Melle's essay "An Open Letter to Transgender Kids Coping with a Hurtful President" appears on Medium.

  • Playboy published Lilly Dancyger's article "Trump's Stance on Anti-Semitism Is a Wake-Up Call for Jews."

  • The Atlantic published Aspen Matis' interview with MIT economist Erik Brynjolffson in "When the Machines Take Our Jobs, Will We Be Freed?" in its CityLab blog.

  • "True Story: I Was Once Almost On A Reality Show," writes Melissa Petro for Ravishly. (Spoiler: She's glad about that almost.)

  • Masha Hamilton has received a Dora Maar Fellowship from the Brown Foundation.

  • Mike Dunphy wrote "What Makes An Art Hotel?" for HotelScoop.

  • Greatist published Lilly Dancyger's essay "Why I Started Eating Meat After 21 Years as a Vegetarian."

March 2017

  • Susan Breen wrote "Should You Go To A Writers' Conference?" for the Miss Demeanors mystery-writing blog.

  • Howl Arts published an excerpt of B.C. Edwards' short-story-collection in-progress Make Work.

  • Redbook published Melissa Petro's essay "I've Made a Career Writing About My Sexcapades — and Now I'm Pregnant."

  • Ashley Shelby's short story "LinkedIn Thought You Might Be Interested in This Post-Climate Impact Job: Environmental Migrant Management and Soil-Free Solutions" is a finalist for the Best of the Net 2016 anthology published by Sundress Publications.

  • Playboy published Lilly Dancyger's article "What We Can Learn from the GOP's Short-Lived Attack on Oversight."

  • Jennifer Keishin Armstrong writes about why Adele had the best night at the Grammys, while the Grammys themselves had the worst.

  • Ebony magazine featured Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich in its article "Honoring the People's Poet: Langston Hughes' Harlem Home Gets New Life."

  • The Rumpus reviewed Robert Repino's new novel Culdesac, saying "Repino’s ability to convince us of the faults of our own society speaks to his skillful crafting of his characters."

  • Barnes & Noble named Kody Keplinger's YA novel Run one of its "7 Perfect Reads for Galentine's Day," saying "you'll cheer through the pain as you watch these girls take on the world."

  • VegNews published Steph Spector's article "6 Books Changing Veganism in 2017."

  • Michael Montlack wrote "Three's Company Made Me The Gay Man I Am Today" to commemorate the sitcom's 40th anniversary this month, in the Advocate.

  • Francesca Ochoa interviewed writer Yin Q about BDSM and her memoir Home of Desperate Magic for Apogee Journal.

  • David Rice's short story "Normal Stigmata" appears in Vol. 1 Brooklyn.

  • Fly Washington magazine published Mike Dunphy's article "Romantic Vienna."

  • Following the death of actress Mary Tyler Moore, Jennifer Keishin Armstrong and her nonfiction book Mary and Lou and Rhoda and Ted were featured in People magazine, Yahoo News, Vogue, and the New York Times, among many others.

  • The Huffington Post published Stacy Parker Le Melle's article, "Disaster Can Be a Tweet Away."

  • Melissa Petro wrote "Will the Backpage Shutdown Make Sex Workers Less Safe?" for Esquire magazine. (The answer: "Women in the industry say now they'll have no choice but to work the streets.")

  • "What we need is less vengeance and more forgiveness." Dan Lopez talks to the Chicago Review of Books about his novel The Show House, the mass shooting last summer at the Orlando nightclub Pulse, and the role of writers in the "struggle to come to terms with the fundamental uncertainty of life."

  • A story by T. Kira Madden will be included in the anthology Go Home! forthcoming in 2018 from Feminist Press.

  • LSU Press will release Meghan Kenny's short story collection Love Is No Small Thing later this month.

  • "The Crops of the Future" by Sarah McColl appears in TakePart magazine's Farm of the Future special issue.

  • The Establishment published Lilly O'Donnell's article "What You Need to Know About Reproductive Coercion."

February 2017

  • Brick Underground published Alanna Schubach's article "How Trump's Threatened Federal Funding Cuts to Sanctuary Cities Could Impact NYC."

  • Ploughshares published Roohi Choudhry's essay "The Undertaker's Home" in its winter issue.

  • Guernica published Kira Madden's essay "The Feels of Love."

  • Playboy published Lilly O'Donnell's article "Bill Nye Will Save the World in a New Netflix Show."

  • The Association for Library Services to Children named Nora Raleigh Baskin's middle-grade novel Nine, Ten: A September 11 Story to its list of Notable Children's Books 2017 Discussion List.

  • Kara Lee Corthron talks about her new YA novel The Truth of Right Now, how to avoid tone-deaf writing, and why authors should create characters outside their own culture, in a Q&A with the Children's Book Council.

  • The Oxford American published Ian Port's article "That Winsome Moan," about the Hawaiian origins of the blues slide guitar, in its Southern Music issue.

  • "You don't look Muslim. You hardly even look Arab," writes Zaina Arafat in her essay "Dear Students: A Letter from Your Muslim American Teacher," for Vice.

  • Lambda Literary reviewed Dan Lopez's new novel The Show House, calling it a "page-turning thriller that is also a thought-provoking meditation on the anxieties and pain that lurk within contemporary gay life."

  • Sarah McColl discovers that maple syrup makes everything better, and writes about it, in "How Vermont Farmers Do Breakfast" for Extra Crispy.

  • Melissa Petro interviewed the Syrian human rights activist Noura Al-Jizawi about how she survived kidnapping, detention, and torture, for Broadly.

  • Lightspeed magazine published Seth Fried's short story "Hello Again."

  • Robert Repino's forthcoming novel D'Arc made BookRiot's list of "What Rioters Are Reading".

  • "The scariest thing about being a daughter is the idea that you won't ever be able to separate from your mother and all she represents," writes Kerry Cohen in her essay "Mourning Debbie Reynolds and Carrie Fisher" for Bitch magazine.

  • Benjamin Obler's essay "Confessions of a Porn Addict" made Longreads' Best of 2016 list.

  • Mike Dunphy talks about taking river cruises on the French Riviera and in Portugal on the Maxa's World podcast.

  • Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich's middle-grade novel Two Naomis has been nominated for an NAACP Image Award in the Outstanding Literary Work for Youth category.

  • Lilly O'Donnell wrote "Ohio's 'Heartbeat Bill' Isn't a Restriction on Abortion. It's an Outright Ban" for Playboy.

  • "People in debt are some of the brightest, most resilient people there are," writes Melissa Petro in her essay "My Preferred Friends? Other Working Class People With Debt" for the Guardian.

  • David Rice's forthcoming novel A Room In Dodge City won the Electric Book Award. It will be released later this month by Alternating Current Press.

  • In Context Journal features Sarah McColl's oral history essay "How to Live."

January 2017

  • The Rumpus interviewed Kerry Cohen and her sister Tyler about their illustrated memoir Girl Trouble, the nature of female friendships, and who's talking behind your back.

  • Hasanthika Sirisena and her short-story collection The Other One were included in Vice's year-end round-up of "The Asian-American Literature That Got Me Through 2016."

  • The Satirist published Jon Reiner's humor story "A Visit from St. Nicholas to Homeland Security."

  • David Rice's novel A Room In Dodge City is available for pre-order. Alternating Current Press will release it in February.

  • The Arch and Bruce Brown Foundation awarded Untitled Theater Company No. 61 a grant to stage the play The Marriage of Alice B. Toklas by Gertrude Stein, written and directed by Edward Einhorn.

  • For Narratively, Lilly O'Donnell wrote about why she and her husband eloped to Tulum, Mexico. (But don't tell her in-laws.)

  • The Times of London published Benjamin Obler's essay "Confessions of a Porn Addict."

  • Creative Nonfiction has nominated essays by two Gotham teachers for Pushcart Prizes, "Economy Class" by Shahnaz Habib and "The Math of Marriage" by Elane Johnson.

  • Narratively published Melissa Petro's essay "Our Dog Would Eat Anything. This Time The Takeout Fought Back."

  • Electric Literature published Michael Backus' essay "What Exactly Does She Think Happens?"

  • The Washington Post's Book Party named Jennifer Keishin Armstrong's Seinfeldia the "Most Enjoyable Book of 2016."

  • Lambda Literary reviewed Scott Alexander Hess' novel The Butcher's Sons, calling it "energetic and muscular," and it "keeps the reader glued to the page, even when we want to look away."

  • St. Julien Press released Elizabeth Cohen's poetry collection Bird Light.

  • TakePart published Sarah McColl's article 'A New Almanac for the Young Farmers of the World."

  • Ashley Shelby won the Enizagam literary journal's annual fiction contest with her short story "Emergent Norm Theory and Post-Climate Change Impact: Appendix A."

  • Simon & Schuster releases Kara Lee Corthron's young adult novel The Truth of Right Now on January 3d.

  • Read to Write Stories interviewed Hasanthika Sirisena and analyzed her short story "Ismail" for its article "How to Figure Out What Really Drives a Character to Act."

  • Laura Yeager is blogging for PsychCentral. Two of her recent posts are "Your Children Keep You Sane" and "Using Social Media to Deal With Personal Tragedy."

  • Brick Underground published Alanna Schubach's article "A South Bronx Reality Check: How Much Change Is the Area Really Seeing?"

  • Mike Dunphy wrote "Welcome to Miami—The New Arts Capital of America" for The Huffington Post.

December 2016

  • Netflix, iTunes, and Hulu are now streaming the documentary film Tree Man, written and directed by Jon Reiner.

  • The Atlantic published Lilly O'Donnell's article about the Electoral College, "Meet the 'Hamilton Electors' Hoping for an Electoral College Revolt."

  • "As anyone who has ever failed to preheat an oven or chill the Champagne knows, to host is to continue to conduct the train when it jumps the tracks. On Thanksgiving in particular, researchers found,...the collaborative solving of the mishap—with ingenuity, a leap up from the table, or a shrug—is essential to how we make the feast meaningful," writes Sarah McColl in her essay "Thanksgiving is a Feast of Things Forgotten," for JSTOR Daily.

  • Edge Media Network reviewed Scott Alexander Hess' new novel Skyscraper, calling it a "page turner ... that leaves a lasting impression."

  • Alibi, an imprint of Random House, released Susan Breen's novel Maggie Dove's Detective Agency, the second book in her Maggie Dove mystery series.

  • Jennifer Keishin Armstrong's book Seinfeldia was a seminfinalist in the Goodreads Choice Awards.

  • "If you're not familiar with waterbugs, if you've confused them with some kind of delicate creature that skips along the surface of a lake, you are adorable." Alice Bradley writes about her creepy new roommates, for The Sun magazine.

  • The editors of the Best American Short Stories series named Roohi Choudhry's "The End of Coney Island Avenue" one of its Distinguished Stories of 2015.

  • Vice featured Bruce Cherry in its article "The Writers Who Make Presidents Funny."

  • Thaïs Miller won The Furious Gazelle's Halloween contest with her short story "Der Wechselbalg in Tribeca."

  • "If rain on your wedding day is good luck, a hurricane must be like hitting the lotto," writes Melissa Petro in her essay "A Hurricane Threatened to Crash My Wedding," for Refinery29.

  • Uncanny Magazine published Jennifer Marie Brissett's short story "Kamanti's Child."

  • Unnamed Press will release Dan Lopez's novel The Show House on December 13th.

  • McSweeney's published N. West Moss' essay "Things To Discuss With My Doctor Before The Hysterectomy."

  • The Huffington Post interviewed Laura Yeager for its article "Writing Through Cancer and Bipolar I Disorder."

  • Space Racers, the animated children's show with music composed by Jody Gray, is now showing Season Two on Sprout.

  • The New Haven Review published David Rice's short story "The Hate Room."

  • Alanna Schubach interviewed Gotham's dean of faculty Kelly Caldwell about neighborhoods, New York City's best self, and flu shots, for Brick Underground.

  • It's "the sort of book that makes my cold heart all warm and fuzzy...the sort of book I just want to thrust at people and say HERE! READ THIS!" wrote Kirkus in its review of Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich's middle-grade novel Two Naomis.

  • Scroll.In asks about the importance of technique vs. magic, and also aquariums in "Why Sri Lankan-American Writer Hasanthika Sirisena Is an Outsider and Likes It That Way."

  • The Forward published Lilly O'Donnell's essay "How Judaism Still Brings My Father Closer to Me," excerpted from her memoir in progress.

  • Mike Dunphy reviews a new hotel in what was once Burlington, Vermont's armory for Hotel-Scoop.

  • Jennifer Keishin Armstrong talks about her new book Seinfeldia and her five-step process for writing great blog posts on the podcast Write With Impact.

November 2016

  • The editors of the Best American Essays series named stories by several Gotham instructors as Notable Essays and Literary Nonfiction of 2015. They are Kate Angus ("My Catalog of Failures"), Roohi Choudhry ("On Island"), Shahnaz Habib ("Hospitality"), and Clifford Thompson ("On the Bus").

  • Entropy published David Rice's "Defying Your Wiring," a review of D. Foy's novel Patricide.

  • Alanna Schubach wrote "Trump Place Residents Are Petitioning to Change the Name on Their Building" for Brick Underground.

  • The Mighty published Stacy Pershall's essay "Instead of Fighting My Bullies, I'm Fighting Stigma."

  • The Viral Demon, written and directed by Jeremy Wechter, is an official selection of New York City Horror Film Festival and will premiere there on November 11th.

  • Off Assignment published Hasanthika Sirisena's story "Letter to a Stranger: Jaffna, Sri Lanka."

  • Tom Brennan talks about voting, the election, and Ben & Jerry's ice cream, on the podcast Applying It Liberally.

  • Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich joined other YA authors in the #FirstVote16 campaign with a video telling the story of the first time she voted.

  • Story Quarterly named Sarah McColl's essay "How Sad, How Lovely" second runner up in its 2016 Nonfiction Prize.

  • Evan Rail took second place for Best Commentary and Criticism in the North American Guild of Beer Writers Awards.

  • Kara Lee Corthron reveals the cover for her forthcoming novel The Truth of Right Now, and talks about how it was designed, for Riveted.

  • The LA Review of Books published Dan Lopez' review, "Recuperating Exile: Ocean Vuong's Night Sky With Exit Wounds."

  • "I don't have superpowers, but I do try to give people the benefit of the doubt as much as I can." Laura Yeager talks to Self Care With Writers about writing, faith, and teaching.

  • Bullett magazine featured Michael Leviton and his storytelling series and podcast The Tell in its article "Listen to Adam Green Tell an Epic Tale in Your New Favorite Podcast, The Tell."

  • Refinery29 interviewed Kody Keplinger about a controversial review of her new novel Run in its article "Is Bisexuality Too 'Mature' For Young Readers?"

  • Unzipped, an imprint of Lethe Press, releases Scott Alexander Hess' novel Skyscraper this month.

  • There's more to Bernie Sanders' hometown than quaint scenery and Ben & Jerry's — Mike Dunphy elaborates in "A Long Weekend in Burlington, Vermont" for Fodor's.

  • The Daily American published an article and video of Nora Raleigh Baskin discussing her middle-grade novel Nine, Ten: A September 11 Story with an auditorium full of elementary school students.

  • Chloè Caldwell's essay collection I'll Tell You In Person made the Village Voice's list of Compelling Books — and Authors — to check out this fall.

  • The Washington Post published Lilly O'Donnell's essay "I Could Have Been the Little Boy in the Overdose Photos."

  • Cosmonauts Avenue interviewed T. Kira Madden about editing a literary journal, balancing the needs of the writer vs. the needs of editors, and looking for stories that create "a tingle in the spine."

  • Robert Repino's novel Culdesac, the second title in his War With No Name series, comes out this month from Soho Press.

  • Carole Bugge is featured poet in Issue No. 4 of the literary journal China Grove.

  • The Daily Beast published Melissa Petro's essay "Sex Work Isn't Sex Trafficking."

  • Jennifer Keishin Armstrong writes about TV anti-heroines and why they're important, for the BBC.

October 2016

  • The music magazine Rawckus named Mike Dunphy its managing editor.

  • Jezebel published Melissa Petro's essay "Former Sex Worker Seeks Happy Ending."

  • Longreads published Benjamin Obler's essay "The Mask of Deception: The Ultimate Test to My Recovery from Porn Addiction."

  • Darby Pop Comics posted an interview with Matthew Cody about his story "Ride Along," which appears in its anthology Women of Darby Pop.

  • Buzzfeed published Zaina Arafat's article "Wrap Star: Meet the Muslim Blogger Who's Proving Modesty Can Be Fashionable."

  • Out of Print published Hasanthika Sirisena's short story "The Other One," the title story in her collection, released earlier this year by the University of Massachusetts Press.

  • Podium, the literary journal of the Unterberg Poetry Center at the 92nd Street Y, published Jon Gingerich's short story "Vest."

  • Nora Raleigh Baskin and her middle grade novel Nine, Ten: A September 11 Story were featured by the New York Times in "A Wave of 9/11 Novels Seeks a New Audience: the Young Reader."

  • Scott Alexander Hess' wrote "FIlmmaker Todd Verow on Dirty Movies, Queer-sploitation, and Dive Bars" for the Huffington Post.

  • Vox published Kelly Caldwell's essay "I helped 9/11 survivors recover. The worst part came six months later."

  • The MF Galaxy podcast interviewed Jennifer Marie Brissett about her novel Elysium and creating intimacy between characters and readers.

  • The University of Chicago Press has released Out of the Wreck I Rise: A Literary Companion to Recovery, which includes excerpts of Domenica Ruta's memoir With or Without You.

  • Lilly O'Donnell wrote "Why Publishing Sexts Is Terrible — And Won't Stop," for Rolling Stone.

  • Thomas & Mercer, an Amazon imprint dedicated to mystery and suspense novels, has acquired Carole Bugge's historical thrillers Edinburgh Twilight and its sequel Edinburgh Dawn.
  • "Solo travel is a great metaphor for many other aspects of life. You can't just move through time and space like a sloth, hoping other forces will step in." David Farley writes about traveling alone, for Four Seasons magazine.

  • Scott Alexander Hess released the book trailer for his new novel Skyscraper, which will be released by Lethe Press in November.

  • "Where else but in a sci-fi comedy can you find such hope in the ridiculous?" Robert Repino asks in "The Fantastic Voyage of Innerspace," for Tor.com.

  • The Village Voice published "Watching the World," Clifford Thompson's review of the new memoir Invisible Man, Got the Whole World Watching by Mychal Denzel Smith.

  • Funds for Writers published Laura Yeager's article "How Writing About My Hardships and Sharing My Weaknesses Is Leading To My Success."

  • Esquire named Jennifer Keishin Armstrong's nonfiction book Seinfeldia to its list of the 25 Best Books of 2016 So Far.

  • PopSugar named Shari Goldhagen's novel 100 Days of Cake one of its "8 of This Year's Hottest YA Books You'll Love Even as an Adult."

  • Coffee House Press releases Chloè Caldwell's essay collection I'll Tell You In Person on October 4th.

  • Amy Shearn's essay "The Surprising Magic of Bad Books" is up at The Rumpus.

  • The New York Times published Jon Reiner's humor piece "Your Self-Driving Car Manual" in its Sunday Review section.

  • Masha Hamilton's essay "Letter to an Ex, on the Occasion of His Suicide" has been published by Longreads.

September 2016

  • The Tonic Theater will present Carole Bugge's play Strings in the Page to Stage New Play Festival at The Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.
  • Melissa Petro interviewed the wife of one of the 100,000 ethnic-Tamil people still missing since the end of the civil war in Sri Lanka, in "What Have You Done With My Husband?" for Narratively.

  • The Drive-In Film Festival, which screens new independent films at drive-in movie theaters for free, will finish its ninth season this month with four films at the Four Brothers Drive-In in Armenia, New York. C.C. Webster is the festival's creative director.

  • "I like people who tell stories they technically shouldn't," Michael Leviton says, in an article on the Vice blog Noisey about his storytelling series and podcast, The Tell.

  • Goodreads interviewed Benjamin Obler about the business, and the best things, of being a writer.

  • Laura Yeager is writing about cancer at Laura Yeager's Cancer Blog. Recent entries include "Trish and Vitamin B17," and "The Rising and Falling of My Boobs."
  • The New World Review published N. West Moss' short story "The Absence of Sound."

  • Publishers Weekly reviewed Chloè Caldwell's new essay collection I'll Tell You In Person, saying she "writes about her life with warmth, humor, and not a trace of apology." Emily Books will release Chloè's collection October 1st.

  • Vogue published Emma Pearse's article "Breathing is the New Yoga! Nine Shortcuts to Calming Anxiety."

  • Book Riot named Lev A.C.Rosen's novel Memory Wall one of its "The Best Books We Read In July."

  • Poetry Daily featured Kate Angus' poem "Complicity."

  • Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich's new middle-grade novel Two Naomis comes out this month from Balzer & Bray/Harperteen.

  • "Travel stories are essentially a fake or altered reality, filtered through the writer and based on how much reporting she or he did on the spot." David Farley talks about the myths of travel writing, in an interview for Nomadic Matt.

  • Melissa Petro is writing the Becoming Bride series for Ravishly. Her recent columns include "My Brother Won't Be Coming to My Wedding," "Bibliotherapy for the Wedding-Obsessed Bride," and "The Best Advice from Real-Life Brides."

  • VinePair published Zaina Arafat's essay "Are You Not Really Muslim If You Drink?"

  • Simon & Schuster will publish Jennifer Keishin Armstrong's next nonfiction book, about the cultural and political impact of the TV series Sex & The City. Jennifer's current book Seinfeldia, out now, has reached the top 20 on the New York Times hardcover nonfiction bestsellers list, and no. 4 on the NYT bestsellers list for books about culture.

  • The New York Times reviewed the Untitled Theater Company #61's production of The Iron Heel, calling it "food for thought with an appealing heart-on-sleeve warmth." Edward Einhorn directed, and he adapted the script from the novel by Jack London.

  • One Teen Story published Arlaina Tibensky's short story "Buying the Farm" and posted an interview with her about writing, adolescence, and ostriches.

  • Jennifer Udden gives advice to new writers on navigating the publishing world in the article "First Time Out: Publishing Tips for New Authors" at The Writer magazine.

  • Michaela Roessner's novella Ah, Sweet Mystery of Life is published in the newly revived OMNI Magazine Online.

  • The Guardian published Lilly O'Donnell's article, "Spanking, Caning, and Consent Play: How Feminist Porn Frees Women from Shame."

  • Mike Dunphy reviewed Phish's concert in New York, part of the band's summer tour, for Rawckus.

  • For Grist, Jennifer Keishin Armstrong contributed to the feature "The Slideshow That Saved the World: An Oral History of An Inconvenient Truth," for which she interviewed former Vice President Al Gore.

  • "If you're putting readers in this crazy world and making them identify with characters that couldn't possibly exist, I think that's what fiction is supposed to do." Robert Repino talks about writing absurdist fiction with Inverse.

August 2016

  • The Washington Post published Lilly O'Donnell's essay, "Planning a Wedding Made Me Reevaluate Every Relationship in My Life."

  • Alice Bradley published her essay "Panic Attacks and Jim Palmer" on Medium.

  • Publishers Weekly reviewed Lev A.C. Rosen's new book The Memory Wall, calling it "a complex, thought-provoking novel."

  • Alanna Schubach's article "NYC Pride: Tracing the History of NYC's Gay Neighborhoods from Past to Present" was published by Brick Underground.

  • The BBC published David Farley's article "The Ultimate Berlin Street Food."

  • " 'Pajaretes cure my migraines,' says one visitor. They're alcoholic and feature either chocolate or coffee. Are you in yet?" writes Diana Spechler in "Everything You Need to Know About Mexico's Secret Morning Cure-All" for Food and Wine.

  • The Literary Review published Robert Repino's short story "We Have the Answer to the Apocalypse."

  • Jennifer Keishin Armstrong's book Seinfeldia has reached No. 13 on the New York Times Hardcover Nonfiction Best Sellers List.

  • Andrew Collins wrote "Standing with Orlando: One Way to Lend Your Support" for Love Wins Texas Weddings.

  • Tom Brennan told the story "A Friend In Need" live in Philadelphia for the Risk! storytelling series and podcast.

  • "Beautiful mirages may indeed appear at the bottom of a bar glass, but in New York, it's no illusion." Mike Dunphy explores the Most Beautiful Bars in NYC, for NewYork.com.

  • Kate Angus discusses poetry, and the mistakes made most often by new poets, on the Line Poetry Podcast.

  • Brick Underground published Alanna Schubach's article "Real Life Stories of Airbnb Racism—And How Some People Are Responding."

  • Kenji Jasper's short story "A Moment of Clarity at The Waffle House" will be included in the anthology Atlanta Noir, out from Akashic Books later this year.

  • Bustle magazine named Jennifer Keishin Armstrong's book Seinfeldia to its list of "Nonfiction Books To Read This Summer."

  • Melissa Petro wrote "Years of Abuse Have Left Me with C-PTSD, Complex Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder" for Ravishly.

  • Busted Halo published Laura Yeager's essay "Born Again Catholic."