Faculty News

If you are a student with publication/production news for us, send the info to Dana Miller, dana at gothamwriters dot com.

September 2019

  • Carmen Bugan's poetry collection Lillies from America comes out September 20th from Shearsman Books

  • The Writer magazine published Susan Breen's article "Choosing the Right Form for Your Story." 

  • Real Simple published Melissa Petro's article "How to Feel at Home in a New Neighborhood." 

  • "When the means to create art is bestowed on a select few, it will also be enjoyed by a select few," writes Alanna Schubach in her op-ed "Bernie Sanders Could Be the Best Arts President in US History." 

  • Tal McThenia's article "The Quest to Find a Lost Arctic Explorer's Buried Soup" is up now at Atlas Obscura

  • The literary magazine The Blotter published N. West Moss' essay "The Cliffs of 3a.m.

  • Crooked Lane Books released Carole Bugge's mystery novel Pride, Prejudice and Poison: A Jane Austen Society Mystery (written under her pen name Elizabeth Blake) on August 13th. 

  • Ahead of the Beverly Hills, 90210 reboot launching on Fox, Mara Reinstein ranked "The 90 Most Important Moments" of the original, for The Ringer

  • St. Louis Magazine recommended Scott Alexander Hess' new novel River Runs Red in its Read This Now column. 

  • The Bergen International Film Festival selected and screened Gail's New Boyfriend, a feature film written and directed by Jim Mendrinos. 

  • "If a blind character I play [has] magic, that's fine, but it needs not to make it so they can see. If I'm going to play a blind character, that's a part of their life." Kody Keplinger talked disability, creativity, and fancy dice on Dragon Talk, the official podcast of Dungeons and Dragons

  • The Odd Magazine published Barbara DeMarco-Barrett's flash fiction story "Noise." 

August 2019

  • Pride, Prejudice, and Poison: A Jane Austen MysteryCarole Bugge's latest mystery novel (written under her pen name Elizabeth Blake), comes out August 13th from Crooked Lane Books

  • Michael Montlack's poems "Is Richard Simmons Missing? Or Is He Just Dearly Missed?" and "The Court Jester" have been published by Tupelo Quarterly

  • DC Kids, an imprint of DC Comics that publishes work for middle-grade readers, announced it will publish Matthew Cody's graphic novel Zatanna and The House of Secrets in February.

  • "Moon" by Carmen Bugan is a Poem of the Week in the Irish Times.

  • Nina Boutsikaris' memoir I'm Trying to Tell You I'm Sorry is a small-press bestseller for second-quarter 2019. 

  • Mara Reinstein's article "Robert Wagner and Stefanie Powers Look Back on Hart to Hart 40 Years Later" is a cover story this month for TV Guide

  • Litbreak published an excerpt of Masha Hamilton's novel in progress Iris Rising

  • The Riverfront Times reviewed Scott Alexander Hess' new novel The River Runs Red, calling it a "captivating novel" that "masterfully captures the cultural through-lines that have defined [St. Louis] since its inception." 

  • Divya Sood's short story "Fear" is one of 10 selected for the 2019 Masters Review Anthology

  • Pacific Standard magazine published Melissa Petro's essay "My Husband Paid Me to Be a Stay-At-Home Mom." 

  • Bedazzled Ink Publishing announced it will publish Jessica Sticklor's novel The Beekeeper's Daughter (under her author's name Jessica Stilling) in September. 

  • The Van Alen Institute, a design and architecture nonprofit that promotes better use of public space, chose Seth Fried's novel The Municipalists as its Book Club pick for July. 

  • Author and essayist Eric LeMay interviewed Nina Boutsikaris about her memoir I'm Trying to Tell You I'm Sorry on the New Books Network

  • Lara Ewen's article "Rock Bottom: Tracing the Decline of Diamond Retail" is in Retail Dive

  • Gabrielle Bellot wrote about the graphic novel On A Sunbeam—"the moody, women-centered, graphic novel space opera we need right now'—for Literary Hub.

  • Barbara Demarco-Barrett's short story "Noise" appears in The Odd Magazine.

July 2019

  • En Route, a short film directed and co-written by Pamela Harris, is an official selection of the SoHo International Film Festival

  • For Publishers Weekly, Gabrielle Bellot interviewed novelist Edwidge Danticat, who tells her "Sometimes people know our most vulnerable places. Because of that, we do things we know we shouldn’t do—things that have tragic outcomes. This is the kind of conflict that I’m drawn to..."

  • GQ's list of "The 31 Best Beach Reads" includes Seth Fried's novel The Municipalists

  • "Thirteen interviews. Six days. Three States. One crazy CRAZY story." Mara Reinstein wrote an oral history of the groundbreaking TV show In Living Color, on the 25th anniversary of its series finale, for The Hollywood Reporter

  • The Mary Sue published Kody Keplinger's essay "How Dungeons and Dragons Became so Wonderfully Gay." 

  • Publishers Weekly reviewed Carole Bugge's forthcoming novel Pride, Prejudice, and Poison (written under the pen name Elizabeth Blake), calling it a "winning, fine whodunit." The mystery novel will be released by Crooked Lane Books in August. 

  • Radix Media published Ashley Shelby's novella Muri as part of its Futures: A Science Fiction Series.

  • Laura Yeager's essays "When Your Grass Is the Worst in the Neighborhood," "Looking for Long-Term Care Insurance," and "Cancer Destroyed My Figure, so I Ate to Comfort Myself" are all featured in Cure Today

  • The Center for Fiction named Alanna Schubach one of its 2019 Emerging Writers Fellows

  • "The American Folk Art Museum earned...Best Manhattan Venue a few years ago, largely because of impresario Lara Ewen, who brings in a wildly diverse and frequently excellent mix of global folk styles along with Americana and singer-songwriters." So says New York Music Daily, which also called Lara "Manhattan's most fearless impresario" and said she "has one of the most magically mutable voices in town."  

  • The Poetry Foundation published Gabrielle Bellot's essay "Lady of the Moon" about the poet Amy Lowell. 

  • Carmen Bugan's forthcoming poetry collection Lillies From America received a special commendation from the Poetry Book Society

  • Justina Ireland's YA novel Dread Nation is now out in paperback. 

  • 1, 2, 3, Jump!, a picture book illustrated by Madeline Valentine, is out now from Roaring Brook Press, an imprint of Macmillan. 

  • In Salon, Seth Fried and fellow novelist K Chess talk about world building in speculative fiction, alternate universes, and why Seth needs to stop describing his new novel The Municipalists as "The Death and Life of Great American Cities meets Jeeves and Wooster.

  • Emmy magazine published Mara Reinstein's interview with novelist Nick Hornby, author of High Fidelity, Fever Pitch, and new television mini-series State of the Union. 

  • Barbara DeMarco-Barrett's article "Actor Omid Abtahi's Career Prospers in Second Season of American Gods" is in Orange Coast Magazine. 

  • Assay: A Journal of Nonfiction Studies published Nina Boutsikaris' essay "On Very Short Books, Miniatures, and Other Becomings." 

June 2019

  • Nina Boutsikaris' essay "Surrender" has been selected for the anthology The Best of Brevity: Twenty Groundbreaking Years of Flash Nonfiction, to be released in 2020 by Rose Metal Press

  • The Blotter published N. West Moss' essay "The Engagement Party.

  • Atlas Obscura published Tal McThenia's article "How a Candy Craze Almost Wiped Out the Barrel Cactus." 

  • Gail's New Boyfriend, a film written and directed by Jim Mendrinos, debuted at the Hoboken Film Festival.  

  • Barbara DeMarco-Barrett wrote "11 over 70: Writers Who Persevere" for the Authors Guild Bulletin

  • Flavorwire named Gabrielle Bellot's LitHub essay "James Baldwin in Paris: On the Virtuosic Shame of Giovanni's Room" to its Recommended Reading list of the "sharpest, funniest, and most thoughtful writing of the week." 

  • Tatjana Soli was longlisted for the 2019 Simpson Literary Prize, awarded to writers who have "earned a distinguished reputation and the approbation and gratitude of readers." 

  • "We’re told our system is meritocratic, that anyone who works hard and wants it enough can pursue a quality higher education and vault themselves up the class ladder. This isn't true," writes Alanna Schubach in her essay "How the Other Half Goes to College" for Jacobin magazine. 

  • Ben Obler's essay "In A Perfectly Dreadful World" appears in the Springboard English Language Arts textbook for middle-school students, published by The College Board. 

  • Tor Books announced it will publish two novels by Jennifer Marie Brissett, starting in 2020 with her speculative fiction novel Eleusis, set on another planet where people from Earth have fled after its destruction.   

  • Food52 published Sarah McColl's essay "The Undeniable Fun of Chile Con Queso, Before and After My Parents' Divorce," in its My Family Recipe section.  

  • Scholastic announced it will publish Kody Keplinger's middle-grade novel Lila and Hadley in the spring of 2020.  

  • In the Harvard Review, Carmen Bugan reviews the poetry collection Atmospheric Embroidery by Meena Alexander, saying it "raises important questions about how much poetry can help us to understand the suffering of others."

  • Crooked Lane Books will publish Carole Bugge's novel Pride, Prejudice and Poison in August, under the pen name Elizabeth Blake. It's the first book in a series of cozy mysteries set in North Yorkshire among members of the Jane Austen Society.

  • En Route, a short film directed and co-written by Pamela Harris, screened at the Anthology Film Archives as part of the NewFilmmakers NY series. 

May 2019

  • Blackstone Books will release Carole Bugge's forthcoming novel Pride, Prejudice and Poison (written under her pen name Elizabeth Blake) as an audio book, narrated by Justine Eyre.

  • Divya Sood's novel Find Someone to Love will be released by Riverdale Avenue Books on May 30th. 

  • Care.com published Melissa Petro's article "What Moms Really Want for Mother's Day (and It's Not a Box of Chocolates)." 

  • Billboard published Mara Reinstein's op-ed "Why Veteran Artists Should Stick to Three New Songs Per Concert." 

  • Tal McThenia's article "Erection Fever: How New York's Raw Gay History Ended Up in a Box" appears in Popula.

  • Nine Mile Press published Matthew Lippman's poetry collection A Little Gut Magic

  • "I think I speak for all discerning readers when I say that it can be frustrating when otherwise great books fall down on the giggle front," writes Seth Fried in "The Funniest Writing You Haven't Read" for Electric Literature

  • Harper Books announced it will publlish Jennifer Armstrong's next nonfiction book When Women Invented Television. 

  • The feature film Another City, written by Kuros Charney, is a selection of the Manhattan Film Festval and will be shown there on May 1st. 

  • Shahnaz Habib is a winner of The JCB Prize, "India's most valuable prize for literature," for her translation of the novel Jasmine Days, written by Benyamin.

  • Nina Boutsikaris' memoir I'm Trying To Tell You I'm Sorry will be released on May 15th by Black Lawrence Press

  • Carole Bugge's historical thrillers Edinburgh Twilight and Edinburgh Dusk, published by Thomas + Mercer under the pen name Carole Lawrence, are Amazon best-sellers, reaching the top 20 lists for both Traditional Detective Mysteries and Historical Mysteries. The third book in the series Edinburgh Midnight will be released next year.

  • The Chicago Quarterly Review published Ashley Shelby's short story "Migrant's Milk." 

  • Dancing Girl Press published Mary Donnelly's poetry chapbook Mad World Colored Oil

  • Gabrielle Bellot's essay "Compass" appears in Mal magazine.

  • Sarah McColl talked about structuring her memoir, discovering the value of her own writing, and "the incredible sense of personal power when you can create your own happiness with very little," in an interview with The Rumpus

  • The Writer magazine published Jessica Sticklor's article on creating truly memorable characters in fiction, "Beyond a List of Adjectives." 

  • Guideposts published Laura Yeager's essay "Follow the Star" in its Angels On Earth magazine.

April 2019

  • Thomas & Mercer announced it will publish a new historical mystery series set in the south of France by Carole Bugge. Her Ian Hamilton mystery series, set in 1880s Edinburgh, (also published by Thomas & Mercer under the pen name Carole Lawrence) is a current Amazon best-seller.

  • Amazon Prime is streaming Jim Mendrinos' new comedy special, I'm Not Dead Yet.

  • "Some of Gabriel Garcia Marquez's Best Characters Were Dead People," writes Gabrielle Bellot for Literary Hub.

  • Belle Ombre published Benjamin Obler's short story "Sportsman of the Year." 

  • Marie Carter is a finalist for the Montaigne Medal, given by the Eric Hoffer Awards for "books that illuminate, progress, or redirect thought," for her novel Holly's Hurricane

  • Benjamin Buchholz is The Writer magazine's newest columnist. In his first one, "This Writer's Journey," he talks about the mistakes he hopes you'll avoid, and the accidents that somehow made him a published author.

  • The Washington Post published Jennifer Armstrong's essay "I Thought I Was a Brandon Girl. But Luke Perry Helped Me Realize All I Really Wanted Was a Dylan McKay." 

  • Mara Reinstein remembered the actor Luke Perry after his death, for New York magazine's The Cut.

  • Seth Fried's novel The Municipalists is an official Book of the Month Club selection. 

  • Kate Angus' essay "The Tiger in Harlem Who Helped Me Heal" appears in Catapault magazine. 

  • NPR's Here and Now interviewed Ian Port about his new nonfiction book The Birth of Loud and the role of the electric guitar in modern rock 'n roll. 

  • Jessica Sticklor's article about Fire In My Mouth, a new oratorio about the Triangle Shirtwaist Fire, appears in Bust

  • Literary Mama published Arlaina Tibensky's short story "Masks." 

  • The Los Angeles Times, in a review of Sarah McColl's new memoir, says "Joy Enough is a slim book that feels expansive, both in its ideas and its spirit." Meanwhile, the New York Times Book Review included it on a list of "Three Stunning New Memoirs of Love and Loss." 

  • Laura Yeager blogs for Cure Today, and among her recent posts is "Finding Solace in a Car-Seat Warmer."

  • Jennifer Armstrong is co-hosting the podcast Pop Literacy for the Writer's Bone Network. She dissects 2000s-era nostalgia in a recent episode, and discusses the lasting influence (or lack thereof)  of  Mean Girls, low-rise jeans, and the first iPods, and more.

  • The Guardian included Lev A.C. Rosen's YA novel Jack of Hearts (And Other Parts) on its list of the Best New Books for Children and Teens

  • Shearsman Books announced it will publish Carmen Bugan's latest poetry collection Lillies From America in September. 

March 2019

  • The North Jersey Record featured N. West Moss in its article "They Have Important Stories to Tell," about a reading West organized for local residents writing memoir.

  • "Despite what India tries to erase, we have our Sweetys and Kuhus, too, and they need a voice," writes Divya Sood in her article about the Bollywood film that's become an international sensation, "Ek Laddki Ko Dekha Toh Aisa Laga" or "I Saw a Girl and It Felt Like This," for Romance Daily News.

  • BBC.com published Jennifer Armstrong's article "Wentworth: The Gripping, Groundbreaking Australian Drama." 

  • Justina Ireland is a finalist for the Andre Norton Award for Outstanding Young Adult Science Fiction or Fantasy Book for her novel Dread Nation

  • Michael Montlack's chapbook Roam was a finalist for the Two Sylvias Press Chapbook Prize

  • Nylon named Seth Fried's forthcoming The Municipalists one of its "50 Books You'll Want to Read in 2019." Penguin Books releases Seth's novel on March 19th.

  • The Guardian published Gabrielle Bellot's article "Blackface Is a Strange Ghost That Haunts America." 

  • You really should read Josh Sippie's article on building your presence online in this month's The Writer magazine, "Selling Your Words." 

  • "Super Bowl 2019—Not much happened on the field, but so much did in the kitchen," writes Laura Yeager in "A Note on Stigma from a Woman Who is Trying to Fit In" for PyschCenteral.

  • Lara Ewen looks into the controversy over diamond giant De Beers' program to lab-grow its own gems in "Shedding Light on Lightbox," for Rapaport magazine. 

  • Mara Reinstein's interview with Priscilla Presley, about her marriage to Elvis and the 50th anniversary of his Singer Presents...Elvis TV special, was the cover story for TV Guide

  • Meerkat Press released J.S. Breukelaar's Collisioncollection of fantasy and horror stories, on February 19th. 

  • The Voices Project published Jennifer Marie Brissett's poem "Armour.

  • Literary Hub published Kim Liao's essay "What Collecting 100 Rejections Taught Me About Creative Failure," a follow-up to her viral article "You Should Aim For 100 Rejections a Year.' 

  • "What would've helped you feel more confident when you were struggling?" Elane Johnson skips the small talk and asks the urgent questions in her interview with Stephanie Land, author of the new memoir Maid, for Hippocampus magazine. 

  • The American Library Association named Lev AC Rosen's young adult novel Jack of Hearts (And Other Parts) to its 2019 Rainbow List, a "curated bibliography highlighting high-quality books with significant gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, or queer/questioning content, aimed at children and youth from birth to age 18." 

  • Two Gotham Children's Book Writing instructors are finalists for the Cybils Literary Awards: Kody Keplinger is a finalist in the Young Adult Novels category for her book That's Not What Happened, and Justina Ireland is a finalist in the Young Adult Speculative Fiction category for her novel Dread Nation

  • Jerry Jazz Musician published a profile of Carole Bugge as part of its series on past winners of its annual Short Fiction Contest, which Carole won in 2005 for her mystery story "Uncle Evil Eye." 

  • "He says, 'You Smell Like the '70s,'" a poem by Michael Montlack, appears in The Nervous Breakdown

  • Sarah McColl talks about why she refused to call her memoir a book for a long time, and the biggest challenge she faced in finishing it, in "Ten Questions for Sarah McColl" in Poets & Writers magazine. 

February 2019

  • Two Gotham instructors have been shortlisted for the 2019 PEN America Literary Awards. Meghan Kenny is a finalist for the Pen/Hemingway Award for a Debut Novel for her book The Driest Season, and Akil Kumarasamy is a finalist for the Pen/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Short-Story Collection for her book Half Gods

  • Gabrielle Bellot wrote "Trump's Shameful, Cruel Ban on People Like Me" for Literary Hub

  • Barnes & Noble named J.S. Breukelaar's Collision one of the New Sci-Fi Fantasy Books We Can't Wait to Read in 2019. Meerkat Press will release the collection of short dark fiction on February 19th. 

  • iBudTender published Stacy Pershall's article "CBD For Pets: Carbon's Story."

  • The production company All In Pixels released a short film adapting Justina Ireland's story "A Theory of Flight." 

  • If you find yourself regularly lying to your child's pediatrician, Melissa Petro rounded up some experts with advice for you, at Care.com.

  • The New York Times reviewed Ian Port's nonfiction book The Birth of Loud, calling it "a hot-rod joy ride through mid-20th Century history." 

  • Mara Reinstein interviewed Steve Martin and Martin Short about their upcoming Now You See Them, Soon You Won't comedy tour, for Parade magazine. 

  • Laura Yeager's short story "The Orderly" appears in the winter/spring 2019 issue of Kaleidoscope.

  • Alanna Schubach is a finalist for the Calvino Prize for fabulist, experimental fiction, for her short story "Iris."

  • Court Green published three poems by Michael Montlack, including "No One Imagines Clowns Having Sex."

  • "Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood premiered in 1963, one of the most difficult and divided years in modern American history. And yet...the show and its creator foresaw a world that could shed the petty differences holding society back." Robert Repino revisits "What Mr. Rogers Taught Us About Storytelling," for Tor.com.

  • Thrillist named Jon Reiner's documentary Tree Man one of "The Best Christmas Movies to Stream on Netflix." 

  • Mara Reinstein interviews Kelly Ripa, host of ABC's daytime talk show Live, about caffeine, kids, and watching Hoarders for New York magazine's The Cut

  • In the LitHub Questionnaire, Sarah McColl says she despises it when reviewers call her new memoir "small, minor, domestic, slight—any shrinking, circumscribing words that equate women’s experience with narrowness of scope."  LIveright Press released Joy Enough January 15th. 

  • JMS Books published Scott Alexander Hess' ghost story "You Will Never Sell This House" as a single. 

  • Gabrielle Bellot wrote about James Baldwin's novel Little Man, Little Man, reissued last year by Duke University Press, in her essay "James Baldwin's Harlem Through A Child's Eyes," for the New York Review of Books

  • Irene Zabytko reviewed the short-story collection Belly Up by Rita Bullwinkel for World Literature Today

  • The Brooklyn Rail reviewed Sarah McColl's memoir Joy Enough, calling it a "delicate, intelligent, and conscientiously slight debut." 

  • Brendan Halpin's story "Mystery Incorporated in Something Fishy!" (or Scooby Doo Vs. the Shadow Over Innsmouth) is available now on Pressbooks

  • Poetry Daily featured Mary Donnelly's poem "Scrimshaw." 

January 2019

December 2018

November 2018

  • "Desire—in particular, a yearning to be who we are and love freely—is a strange lantern: it wants to be lit bright, but sometimes, to do so is deadly," writes Gabrielle Bellot in "I Will Not Be An Invisible Trans Woman," for the New York Review of Books

  • Susan Breen wrote about why some writers become beloved, and stay popular for generations, in her essay "In The Woods With Agatha Christie" for Miss Demeanors.

  • LitHub published Gabrielle Bellot's essay "The Story I Kept Hidden: On Brett Kavanaugh, Sexual Assault, and Not Staying Silent." 

  • The Cut published Mara Reinstein's essay "I Think About This A Lot: The Legend of the A-Rod Centaur Painting.

  • Kody Keplinger's short story "Britt and the Bike God" is included in the anthology Unbroken: Thirteen Stories Starring Disabled Teens, out now from Farrar Straus Giroux Books for Young Readers

  • Little, Brown Books for Young Readers released Lev A.C. Rosen's young adult novel Jack of Hearts (and Other Parts)

  • Pacific Standard magazine published Kelly Caldwell's essay "There's a Sociological Explanation for Why People Rush in to Help Communities Struck by Disaster" in its There's a Name For That feature. 

  • En Route, a short film directed by and co-written by Pamela Harris, is a selection of the Adirondack Film Festival

  • Barbara DeMarco-Barrett writes about her typewriter addiction in "Tap, Tap Click" for the Authors Guild Bulletin

  • Emily Rapp Black collaborated on the memoir I Should Have Honor: A Memoir of Faith and Hope in Pakistan by Khalida Brohi, released in September by Random House.

  • Simon & Schuster revealed the cover for Ian Port's forthcoming nonfiction book The Birth of Loud: Leo Fender, Les Paul, and the Guitar-Pioneering Rivalry That Shaped Rock-n-Roll.

  • John Kachuba's paranormal novel Dark Entry is out now, from Hellbender Books (an imprint of Sunbury Books).

  • Fairy Tale Forest, an animated TV musical created and adapted by Jody Gray (with Allan Neuwirth) is in production for 2019 release. Based on the classic Grimm Brothers fairy tale “Jorinde and Joringel,” it features songs by Jody Gray and Allan Neuwirth, and the first episode stars Mel Brooks, Jane Lynch, Jennifer Holiday, and Matt Lucas, among others. 

  • Quill & Parchment named Carole Bugge its featured poet and published several of her poems, including "Red Bank Road" and "Thoughts While Playing Bach at Midnight."

  • "Ghost bikes 'push cyclist deaths from the fringes of the roadway to the forefront in public spaces,' " writes Melissa Petro in "The Ghost Bikes Project Gives Voice to the Dead" for Nation Swell.  

  • Gabrielle Bellot's essay "1921 — 1946 — 1984 — 2018: A Geneaology of the Totalitarian Novel" is up at LitHub.  

  • Women and Hollywood interviewed Jennifer Keishin Armstrong about the all-female writers' room on the TV show Sex and the City, and how it changed Americans' perception of single women. Armstrong's nonfiction book Sex and the City and Us came out in June. 

October 2018

  • Gabrielle Bellot's essay "Borderlands" is included in the anthology Can We All Be Feminists?, published in September by Penguin Books. 

  • Arlaina Tibensky's short story "Buying the Farm" is one of 20 chosen for the 2018 edition of New Stories from the Midwest

  • Mara Reinstein interviews filmmaker Nicole Holofcener about the different demands in writing male and female protagonists and what the late James Gandolfini taught her about vulnerability for Parade magazine. 

  • Rodale Kids (an imprint of Penguin/Random House) released Matthew Cody's illustrated middle-grade novel The Loch Ness Lock-In, the second book in his Strange Scout Tales series. 

  • Balzer + Bray released the middle-grade novel Naomis Too, co-written by Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich, and Kirkus reviewed it, calling it "a sequel that packs as much heart, humor, and understanding as the first."

  • Jessica Penner's essay "Waiting" appears in Wordgathering, a journal of disability poetry and literature. 

  • The Orange County Register profiled Barbara DeMarco-Barrett about her writing, her speaker series, and the upcoming 20th annviersary of her radio program Writers on Writing

  • Kody Keplinger's new YA novel That's Not What Happened is reviewed by Publishers Weekly, which called it "an original and engrossing narrative about scars, recovery, and how the stories we tell can both sustain and hobble us." 

  • Lethe Press announced it will publish Scott Alexander Hess' novel The River Runs Red in the fall of 2019.

  • Carole Bugge's historical thriller Edinburgh Dusk (written under the pen name Carole Lawrence) was published by Thomas & Mercer in September.  It is Book 2 in her Ian Hamilton Mysteries series. 

  • "I spoke to other moms about their missteps, and apparently, none of us are perfect!" writes Melissa Petro in her article "Six Mistakes I Made My First Year as a Parent—And Which You Can Avoid." 

  • The American Journal of Poetry has published two of Michael Montlack's poems: "Future Lover" and "Schroder." 

  • Laura Yeager is blogging for PsychCentral. Recent posts include "Suicide: From The Edge and Back Again," "Goodbye, Duke: When Your Therapist Retires," and "Rainy Vacations Can Be Good for You." 

  • "Sex and the City did give us one great tool for more empowered sex lives, whether we’re seeking better experiences in bed or trying to process how sex has been used against us: brunch,"writes Jennifer Keishin Armstrong in her essay "How Sex and the City Holds up in the #MeToo Era," for Vanity Fair. Jennifer's nonfiction book Sex and the City and Us came out in June.

  • N. West Moss' memoir Fruitless won the Faulkner-Wisdom prize in narrative nonfiction given by the Pirate's Alley Faulkner Society.  

  • Popula published Tal McThenia's essay "The Curse of the Jenny Inverts." 

  • "Picnic Street," a short story by Joe Okonkwo, appears in the literary journal The New Engagement

  • Akil Kumarasamy curated a Reading List to Remind You That All Borders Are Fictional over at Electric Literature.

  • Tal McThenia's essay "Playing With Guns: It's All Fun and Games Til Somebody Gets Shot" is up at Popula. https://popula.com/2018/07/18/playing-with-guns/

  • The Writer magazine published Jen Glantz's artice "Memoir Versus Essay Collection: Which Fact-Based Form Fits You Best?