Faculty News

If you are a student with publication/production news for us, send the info to Dana Miller, dana at gothamwriters dot com.

September 2021

  • My Mother's Severed Head, a new play directed by Richard Caliban, opens at Theatre Row in New York City on September 10th. 

  • Blackstone Publishing announced it will publish Alanna Schubach's debut novel The Nobodies in June 2022.

  • Mara Reinstein interviewed actor Blair Underwood, and asked him all about the big cookie episode on Sex and the City, among other things, for Vulture.

  • Shearsman Books announced it will publish Carmen Bugan's poetry collection Time Being in 2022. 

  • Kirkus gave a starred review to N. West Moss's memoir Flesh & Blood(forthcoming from Algonquin Books in October), saying it's "a healing balm [that] lights a path through grief and illness." Meanwhile, Publishers Weekly is calling it, "powerful," "poetic," and "enriching." 

  • Kelly Caldwell's craft article "If I Want Your Opinion, I'll Pay You For It" is included in the anthology Getting to the Truth: The Craft and Practice of Creative Nonfictionout now from Hippocampus Books

  • Tangerine Press has released Bestiary, a chapbook of three short stories by Seth Fried. 

  • The Tor/Forge blog posted an excerpt from Jennifer Marie Brissett's novel The Destroyer of Light, coming from Tor Books in October. 

  • Lara Ewen offers advice, which may or may not involve bourbon, to Christina Applegate and anyone else newly diagnosed with MS, over at Insider

  • Dorothy Parker's Ashes published N. West Moss's short story "She Is a Mess." 

  • New York Times theater critic Elisabeth Vincentelli included Edward Einhorn's latest play Alma Baya in her round-up of don't-miss indy theater productions, "Theater to Stream: Offerings on the Fringe of the Edinburgh Fringe." 

  • Anni Irish interviewed author and performance artist Iván Monalisa Ojeda about "walking while trans laws," writing truly original short fiction, and living with two spirits, for Observer

  • Kristin Rockaway's novel Life, Unscheduled (forthcoming this month from Montlake) is an Amazon First Reads selection.

  • Shondaland published Rachel Simon's essay "Simone Biles Is More Than Her Accomplishments — And So Are All of Us." 

  • Maggie Dove, the first novel in Susan Breen's cozy mystery series, has been re-released in paperback.

  • St. Louis magazine featured Scott Alexander Hess in its Read This column, recommending his new set of two novellas Lightning and The Root of Everything, out now from Rebel Satori Press.

  • Jessica Sticklor and her latest (and forthcoming) novels are the subject of a profile in the Brattleboro Reformer.

  • Janine Annett's graphic essay "I Am Wearing-Pajamas-At-7-p.m. Years Old" is up now at McSweeney's. 

  • Several publications have reviewed the anthology Palm Springs Noir, edited by Barbara DeMarco-Barrett, including the Los Angeles Times, which said it "leaves the sliding glass door open for ghosts present as well as past;" Kirkus, "an engaging mix of the good, the bad, and the off-kilter;" and the Orange County Register, "dark and dangerous."

  • "Someone must also be tasked with gazing at the clouds." Carmen Bugan's essay "Why Literature Must Be Part of the Language of Recovery from Crisis," up now at the Oxford University Press blog. 

  • The Revealer published Robert Repino's essay "Good Places, Uploads, and Reimagining the Afterlife in Popular Culture."  

August 2021

  • Death and Sensibility—the second novel in the Jane Austen Society mystery series by Carole Buggé, writing under the pen name Elizabeth Blake — comes out August 10th from Crooked Lane Books.

  • The Young Adult Library Services Association named Kristin Rockaway's novel My Epic Spring Break (Up) a Quick Pick for Reluctant Readers

  • An excerpt from Maria Alejandra Barrios's novel-in-progress A Cilantro Wedding Bouquet is up now at Catapault magazine. 

  • Oxford University Press will release Carmen Bugan's essay collection Poetry and the Language of Oppression on August 17th. 

  • The animated feature film Straight Outta Nowhere: Scooby-Doo Meets Courage the Cowardly Dog, featuring music by Gotham teacher Jody Gray, will be released by Warner Bros. Entertainment on September 14th. 

  • D.X. Faros released Jessica Sticklor's latest novel The Weary God of Ancient Travelers.

  • Greenwillow Books revealed the cover design for Erin Entrada Kelly's middle grade novel Those Kids From Fawn Creek and announced it will release the book in March 2022. 

  • Lambda Literary named Scott Alexander Hess' new novellas The Root of Everything and Lightning to its list of Most Anticipated LGBTQ Literature. Rebel Satori Press released the novellas on July 13th. 

  • Angie Chatman profiled Burunda Prince, COO of the Russell Innovation Center for Entrepreneurs, in "Closing the Gap for Black Business Owners" for the MIT Technology Review.

  • Josh Sippie's short story "Bunny" is up now at Stone of Madness.

  • Kirsten Imani Kasai is featured in the video essay "Are You Dreading a Return to Normal? You Are Not Alone" in the New York Times

  • The Week-Junior named Erin Entrada Kelly's novel Maybe, Maybe Marisol Rainey its Book of the Week.

  • Publishers Weekly reviewed Palm Spring Noir, edited by Barbara DeMarco-Barrett, saying, "It’s rare to find a group of stories without a bad one, but DeMarco-Barrett has chosen well and there’s not a dud in the bunch."

  • Mara Reinstein interviewed Lin-Manuel Miranda and his father Luis Miranda about family, community, and the film adaptation of In The Heights, for Parade magazine. 

  • Melissa Petro wrote "I Divide My Days Into the 'Maker' and the 'Manager' Schedule to Be More Efficient as a Working Mom" for Business Insider.

  • The New Yorker published Janine Annett's "Lipstick Recommendations For Fully Vaccinated People" in its Daily Shouts column. 

  • The Sewanee Review published Alanna Schubach's short story "The Man Upstairs." 

  • Slate published Robert Repino's essay "The Real Delaware County is Nothing Like Mare of Easttown." 

July 2021

  • Mara Reinstein reviewed Black Widow for Us Weekly, saying "As much as we root for Black Widow and have long clamored for this day, wading into her past at this point seems a wee bit counterproductive." 

  • Rock and a Hard Place magazine published Barbara DeMarco-Barrett's short story “Pink Aviary.”

  • "When we asked what you would do with the $10,000 prize money, you described a pyramid scheme that would prey on the elderly." Seth Fried catalogues contestant errors to avoid in "For These Reasons, You've Been Chopped" for 251.

  • Barnes & Noble named Lev A.C. Rosen's novel Camp as its Young Adult Fiction Monthly Pick for June.  

  • Robert Repino's novel Malefactor, the third and final installment in his War With No Name series, will be released by SoHo Press on August 24th. 

  • It's the 20th anniversary of the iconic Buffy the Vampire Slayer episode "The Gift," and Rachel Simon wrote about its lasting inflence, for Vulture.  

  • Erin Entrada Kelly will break into nonfiction with her YA biography of World War II Allied spy Josefina "Joey" Guerrero, forthcoming from Greenwillow Books in 2023. 

  • The Wild Rose Press announced it will publish the first two novels in a new series by Angela Lam called Women of the Crush. The first book, Love Again, will be published in 2022.

  • Kirkus reviewed Divya Sood's novel Find Someone to Love, describing it as "observant, stirring writing that explores the challenges of openness."

  • Michael Montlack's poem "Love" appears in the Santa Fe Writers Project Quarterly

  • Kenji Jasper wrote "From the Neon: The Keyser Soze of It All" for Medium.

  • SixtyEight2OhFive published Alysia Li Ying Sawchyn's essay "1973: Pink Floyd, Dark Side of the Moon." 

June 2021

  • NBC News named Erin Entrada Kelly's middle-grade novel Maybe, Maybe, Marisol Rainey to its list of "Twelve Books Featuring Asians That Will Inspire Young Girls to Know Their Value."

  • DC Comics released the graphic novel Poison Ivy: Thorns, written by Kody Keplinger, on June 1st. 

  • Alysia Li Ying Sawchyn's essay collection A Fish Growing Lungs is a finalist for the 2020 Believer Book Award in nonfiction. 

  • Refinery29 published Rachel Simon's article "Mirror, Mirror on the Wall, How Did Shrek Inspire the Greatest Fandom of Them All?" 

  • Mara Reinstein interviewed the production designer and set decorator for the new HBO series Hacks about creating a home for the show's main character that reminds people of a Cheesecake Factory, for Architectural Digest.  

  • Lara Ewen's article "Healthy Distance: Telemedicine Brings House Calls to Local Libraries" is up now at American Libraries magazine. 

  • Anni Irish co-wrote "Your Everything-to-Know Guide on All Things Sex, Gender, and Sexuality: Because, Hi, Yup, They Are Not The Same" for Cosmopolitan

  • The Writer magazine published Jessica Sticklor's article "Zoom-onomics 101: How to Sell More Books at a Virtual Book Launch." 

  • Melissa Petro wrote "Five Working Moms on What They Really Want This Mother's Day" for Business Insider.

  • Oxford University Press's Academic Insights for the Thinking World published Carmen Bugan's essay "Lyricism as Activism: Sigurd Olson and The Singing Wilderness."

  • bp Magazine published Laura Yeager's article "No More Hiding" in its spring issue.

  • The Irish literary magazine Channel has published Michael Backus's short story "Distant Smoke," which you can listen to an excerpt of here

  • Alysia Li Yin Sawchyn talks about first drafts, favorite works, and who she wants to be when she grows up, in a To Wit: Flash Interview over at Assay Journal

  • Shondaland published Rachel Simon's article "Ten Years After Bridesmaids, Why Are There Still so Few R-Rated, Female-Led Comedies?"

  • Hole In The Head Review published Fran McNulty's poem "A Nine-Year-Old New Yorker." 

  • Dan Lopez is now an assistant editor with Counterpoint Press

  • Down and Out Books selected Barbara DeMarco-Barrett's short story "Pool Fishing" for its anthology Crossing Borders.

  • "Newbery Medalist [Erin Entrada] Kelly once again shows her knack for capturing a childlike perspective," says Publishers Weekly in its review of Erin's middle-grade novel Maybe, Maybe, Marisol Rainey, released in May by Greenwillow Books

May 2021

  • Jessica Sticklor wrote "Five Steps to Write a Young Adult Novel" for BookFox.

  • iPondr published Angie Chatman's article "Women Are Finding New Ways to Re-Enter the Job Market." 

  • Greenwillow Books will release the middle grade novel Maybe, Maybe Marisol Rainey, written and illustrated by Erin Entrada Kelly, on May 4th.  

  • Practicing intellectual humility, seeking emotional validation, and logging off social mediaare some of the tactics Melissa Petro has tried to fight the epidemic of pandemic anger; she recommends them and several others over at Business Insider

  • Fractured Lit published Maria Alejandra Barrios's short-story "Things Never Stay Warm." 

  • Thomas & Mercer announced it would publish Amina Akhtar's thriller Kismet and signed her to a two-book deal.  

  • Kirkus reviewed Palm Springs Noir—an anthology of short crime stories, all set in sunny southern California and edited by Barbara DeMarco-Barrett—and called it "an engaging mix of the good, the bad, and the off-kilter."  

  • Anita Gill reviewed the novel Low Country by J. Nicole Jones in "The Unique Dialogue Between Past and Present," for the Chicago Review of Books

  • No Contact magazine published Tommy Dean's short story "Among Their Skin." 

  • Edward Einhorn adapted Jack London's novel The Iron Heel into a three-part audio drama, released May 1st by Untitled Theatre No. 61

  • Remember the 2011 Oscars ceremony, hosted by James Franco and Anne Hathaway? Mara Reinstein does, and she writes about why it all went so horribly wrong, for The Ringer

  • The Atlantic magazine published Michael Leviton's essay "What I Learned About Love Once I Stopped Being Honest." 

  • 50-Word Stories published N. West Moss's flash-fiction "A Man, Not Her Husband." 

  • Kristin Rockaway's YA novel My Epic Spring Break (Up) was released by Underlined, an imprint of Penguin Random House. 

  • Forge, an imprint of Macmillan Publishers, announced it will publish Lev A.C. Rosen's novel The Lavender House, a 1950s detective story featuring lip-synching, police raids, and a flirty butler, as part of a two-book deal. 

  • "I’ve revised paragraphs in my head while nursing, tapped out a few hundred words while the pasta is boiling, written the script for my graphic memoir on my lunch hours at work. It is not ideal, but it is all I have sometimes." Teresa Wong talks about creativity, rejection, and parenting in an interveiw with the literary journal Nurture

  • For Raleigh magazine, Rachel Simon interviewed a hospitality-group owner keeping his restaurants open despite fires, evictions, and a pandemic.

  • Carole Bugge is a contributor to the new anthology How to Write a Mystery (Scribner), co-published with the Mystery Writers of America and edited by Lee Child.

April 2021

  • Tommy Dean's flash story "But They'd Never Believe Me" was published by Five South.

  • The Writer magazine published Josh Sippie's craft article "The Snapshot Theory: The Story Outside Your Story Is a Story, Too." 

  • The Moth Radio Hour featured Angie Chatman performing her story "A Knitted Peace" in its Help Me episode.  

  • Rachel Simon wrote "Keeping Up With the Kardashians Is Ending but the Family's Influence on Body Image Isn't" for NBCThink

  • Teresa Wong's comic "Drive-Thru" appears in The Rumpus as part of its Spotlight Series. 

  • Lev Rosen's novel Camp is a finalist for a Lambda Literary Award in the LGBTQ Young Adult category. 

  • Underwood, the literary magazine, published Adela Brito's poem "Strolling by the Cemetery on Olivia Street." 

  • Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers released the picture book More Than Fluffwritten and illustrated by Madeline Valentine.

  • Erin Entrada Kelly's debut novel Blackbird Fly made its audiobook debut last month. 

  • Literary Matters published Carmen Bugan's poem "She Looks in the Mirror.

  • Melissa Petro wrote "Why It's OK to Give Your Kid Extra Screen Time" for Business Insider

  • The Onion A.V. Club added Jennifer Keishin Armstrong's When Women Invented Television to its recommended books for March, calling it the "perfect read" for pop-culture and women's history fans. 

  • Prairie Schooner published Michael Montlack's poem "I've Been Told My Birth Mother Believed in Aliens" and nominated it for a Pushcart Prize. 

  • LA Magazine named Kristin Rockaway's forthcoming My Epic Spring Break (Up) to its list of "Five YA Novels We Can't Wait to Read This Spring." The novel releases from Penguin Random House on April 6th. 

  • Rachel Simon bought a question-a-day journal, and thinks you should, too. She explains why over at HelloGiggles.

March 2021

  • The Last Cyclist, directed by Edward Einhorn, is an official selection of the NYC Indie Theatre Film Festival, showing online March 10th through 14th. 

  • Brendan Halpin's new YA novel Legacy, a mystery set against an admissions scandal at an elite university, is out now from Gum Road.

  • For The Drift, Alanna Schubach reviewed the CBS All Access show The Stand, adapted from the Stephen King novel, saying the mini-series "revels in the grotesquerie of an accidentally-released biological weapon, nicknamed Captain Trips..." 

  • The Observer published Anni Irish's review of the exhibition eddy at the gallery M 2 3 Projects, calling it "deceptively complex." 

  • Lev A.C. Rosen's YA novel Camp is included on the list of "Must-Read Books That Celebrate Jewish Love.

  • Points In Case published Josh Sippie's humor piece "I, Teddy Roosevelt, Accept Chef Aut's ThaiFire Challenge." 

  • Transition magazine will publish Kirsten Imani Kasai's poem "Trine" in its upcoming Truth and Trope issue.

  • "As an artist, you are constantly finding yourself. Music is an outward expression of those internal insights," rapper Nissim Black tells Angie Chatman in her article "What It Means to Be Black and Jewish in America," for iPonder.

  • Mara Reinstein wrote "The Uncensored Story of the Friends Superbowl Episode" for The Hollywood Reporter.

  • Space and Time magazine published Jennifer Marie Brissett's poem "Damaged Roots."

  • Rachel Simon sampled pretty much every hot chocolate in Raleigh, North Carolina, for her article "Crazy for Cocoa" in Raleigh Magazine

  • Blaise Allysen Kearsley reviewed the memoir Surviving the White Gaze by Rebecca Caroll, calling it "generous, intimiate, searching, and formidable," for the Boston Globe

  • The New York Times published Joselin Linder's essay "My Quest for Sadness."

  • Robert Repino's middle grade novel Spark and the Grand Sleuththe sequel to his novel Spark and the League of Ursus, comes ou on March 23rd from Quirk Books.

  • Serial magazine published Barbara DeMarco-Barrett's short story “Hunting Season.”

  • The New York Times reviewed Emily Rapp Black's new memoir Sanctuary, calling it "an often beautiful jewel of a book." 

  • Erin Entrada Kelly's middle grade novel Hello, Universe made the monthly New York Times Bestsellers List in January. 

  • To Be Honest by Michael Leviton is one of only six books named to Goodreads' list of Great Books Hitting the Shelves. Abrams Press released Michael's memoir on January 5th.   

February 2021

  • The American Library Association named We Dream of Space by Erin Entrada Kelly one of five Newbery Honor Books for 2021. 

  • The Irish Times' chose Carmen Bugan's "On the 2021 Presidential Inauguration" as its Poem of the Week

  • A good story "is often circular, and it sort of spins around a resolution and touches on the resolution, and then spins out and then comes back to it. It's a lot more like life." Theresa Okokon, co-host of Stories of the Stage on WORLD Channel, talks to Angie Chatman about what makes a good story, for iPondr.

  • Ovenbird Poetry published "She Loves the Earth Without Curse Words" by Matthew Lippman, which begins "Natalie says, 'Dad, quarantine's good for you.' "

  • The readers of Uncanny Magazine voted Jennifer Marie Brissett's "Through The Veil" their favorite story of 2020.  

  • Business Insider published Melissa Petro's article "Milions of American Workers Have Children. Because of the Pandemic, We Can Now Stop Pretending They Don't."

  • Alysia Li Yin Sawchyn's essay collection A Fish Growing Lungs has been longlisted for the Believer Book Award in Nonfiction

  • Observer published Mara Reinstein's article "Matt Shakman Reveals How He Nailed the Sitcom Style of WandaVision."

  • Anni Irish wrote about the performance artist Kalup Linzy in "Identity Politics, COVID19, and the Future of Performance Art," for Observer.

  • "How Honest Is Too Honest?" Michael Leviton recommends books that push the boundaries, over at Literary Hub.

  • The Great Lakes College Association named Nina Boutsikaris' memoir I'm Trying to Tell You I'm Sorry the 2021 New Writers Award for Creative Nonfiction.

  • Random House released Emily Rapp Black's memoir Sanctuary on January 19th. 

  • Seth Fried tries out epigrams for his epitaph, over at 251.

  • Jacob Appel's novel Winter Honeymoon is a small press bestseller for November-December. 

  • American Libraries magazine published Lara Ewen's article "Tarnished Legacies: Presidential Libraries Grapple With the Histories of Their Subjects." 

  • Brevity Blog published Josh Sippie's post about Gotham's Writers Conference, "A New Author-Meets-Agent Model." 

  • The Literary Hatchet published Barbara DeMarco-Barrett's short story "Making Peanuts in Nevada." 

January 2021

  • Laura Yeager compares writers to chorus line dancers in Broadway musicals, saying both must "make love to an audience—to make bawdy faces at the crowd as if I know and love them all" in her essay "I'm a Chorus Girl Writer" in Author magazine. 

  • The Broad River Review published Barbara DeMarco-Barrett's poem "Meditation at Laguna Beach." 

  • Pangyrus published Angie Chatman's essay "Ode to Pound Cake" (with the recipe!), and nominated it for a Pushcart Prize.

  • Rebel Satori Press will publish The Root of Everything by Scott Alexander Hess, featuring two novellas, in July 2021.

  • "It feels almost like a real-life 'It Gets Better' montage — actual, visible proof that healing is possible, even for a teen who once was suicidal and involved in self-harm." Rachel Simon reflects on Vanity Fair's fourth annual interview with pop star Billie Eilish, for Shondaland.

  • Michael Leviton's memoir To Be Honest comes out January 5th, from Abrams Books

  • Town and Country magazine published Jennifer Keishin Armstrong's essay "How Sex and the City Helped New York Recover After 9/11." 

  • The Cincinnati Review published Casandra Lopez's essay "Erasure: Lineage." 

  • Anni Irish's article "How Amy Coney Barrett's Confirmation Could Affect Queer Americans" is up now at The Body

  • We Dream of Space by Erin Entrada Kelly has been named to several Best Books for Kids of 2020 lists, including by the New York Times, the New York Public Library, the Chicago Public Library, the Horn Bookand Book Page

  • Rachel Simon explains "Why You're Having So Many Nightmares" and has some advice for you, at HelloGiggles

December 2020

  • Crocodile bookmarks! Custom library prints! Socks just for reading! Lara Ewen rounded up the perfect gift guide for book lovers over at American Libraries magazine. 

  • "The Ghost of Bobby Dunbar," an episode of This American Life written and reported by Tal McThenia, is included on the New York Times list of "Seven Great Episodes for Thanksgiving."

  • The School Library Journal named books by two Gotham instructors to its Best of 2020 list: Erin Entrada Kelly's middle-grade novel We Dream of Space, and Lev A.C. Rosen's young adult novel Camp

  • The Rumpus published Angie Chatman's essay "American, Not Blonde." 

  • "Why do we so need to be 'seen' by others, and how do we live with the knowledge that they don’t see us the way we’d like them to?" asks Alanna Schubach in this interview with The Massachusetts Review

  • D.X. Varos released Jessica Sticklor's middle-grade fantasy novel Rise of the Hidden Prince, the second book in her series The Pan Chronicles. 

  • Robert Repino's middle-grade fantasy novel Spark and the Grand Sleuth, the second installment in the League of Ursus series, will be released in March 2021 by Quirk Books, a division of Penguin Random House

  • Shelf Awareness gave a starred review to Dewaine Farria's new novel Revolutions of All Colors, calling it an "extraordinary debut," written "with vibrant, breathtaking eloquence."  

  • Business Insider published Melissa Petro's essay "I Lost My Job as a Public School Teacher For Having a Provocative Past." 

  • Jennifer Keishin Armstrong's booklet How to Come Up With All Those Words: A Practical Guide to Writing a Successful Nonfiction Book, From Conception to Publication is available now at Gumroad. 

  • Architectural Digest published Mara Reinstein's article about set design for HBO's latest mini-series, "The Undoing Has Drama, Suspense, and Plenty of New York Real Estate Porn."  

  • "It certainly feels like the City of Boston is trying to widow me for the second time," writes Brendan Halpin in his essay "Ventilation Blues," for Medium

  • C.C. Webster appeared on the podcast Release Date Rewind to deep dive the 1995 films To Die For and Empire Records, (especially Empire Records). 

  • Tony Conniff examines the classic "Tangled Up In Blue" in his essay "In Praise of Bob Dylan's Narrative Strategies...and His Verbs," for Literary Hub.  

  • Yahoo!Life published Angie Chatman's article "Sex Ed in the Time of Covid: Why Some Experts Are Concerned for LGBTQ Students." 

  • The Milford House Mysteries podcast interviewed Margarat Meacham about her novel The Ghosts of Laurelford, and writing mysteries for young readers. 

  • "This book has wide appeal and offers something we all desperately need: light and laughter." Erin Entrada Kelly reviews the middle-grade novel Lupe Wong Won't Dance for the New York Times Book Review.  

  • Cold Wars Conversations, a podcast preserving the history of the Cold War, featured Carmen Bugan and her memoir Burying the Typewriter in its episode "A Childhood Under the Eyes of the Secret Police."

  • Angie Chatman performed her story "Taking A Long Time" on the RISK! storytelling podcast's Learning episode. 

November 2020

  • "Gustavo “Goose” Alvarez and I were in prison at the same time during the 1990s, though our stories are remarkably different," writes Cullen Thomas for the Rumpus, the latest in his Conversations With Literary Ex-Cons series.

  • The film production company Anonymous Content announced it is developing Tom Cooper's novel Florida Man (released by Random House in July) as a limited series

  • Fordham University Press announced it will publish Marie Carter's narrative nonfiction book Mortimer and the Witches in fall 2022. 

  • Ben Obler wrote about his ugly, beautiful porch for Upstate House magazine's A Savored Place column. 

  • Dewaine Farria won the inaugural Veterans' Writing Award, sponsored by Syracuse University Press, for his forthcoming novel Revolutions of All Colors. He'll be reading from his book, along with novelist Tobias Wolf, at the Veterans Writing Award event on November 12th, which will be held virtually. 

  • Edward Einhorn's play The Resistible Rise of J.R. Brinkley is out now as a four-part radio-play-style podcast

  • Libro.fm named Jennifer Marie Brissett's novel Elysium to its monthly list of Reading Recommendations

  • The Sewanee Review named Alanna Schubach a semi-finalist in its annual Fiction Contest. 

  • Two Gotham instructors have been named 2020 New York Foundation for the Arts Fellows in Nonfiction Literature: Shahnaz Habib and Stacy Parker LeMelle. 

  • Stacy Pershall appeared on Anthony Padilla's I Spent A Day With... 

  • Business Insider published Angie Chatman's article "Segregation Has Been Embraced, Mandated, and Maintained in the United States By Law and By Policy — Here's How." 

  • Rachel Simon finishes at least one jigsaw puzzle a week, and she's compiled a list of the best ones for grownups who like a challenge, in HelloGiggles

  • Lara Ewen's article "A Case for Radical Retail Reinvention" is up now at Retail Dive

  • The Cooperative Children's Book Center at the University of Wisconsin-Madison named Erin Entrada Kelly's novel We Dream of Space as its Book of the Week

October 2020

  • Business Insider published Melissa Petro's article "Why His-And-Hers Chores Don't Work." 

  • Angie Chatman traces the fraught relationship between Black Americans and the banking industry to the promise, frauds, and ultimate collapse of Freedman's Bank, in an article for Business Insider

  • Love's Executive Order published Matthew Lippman's poem "It's the Best America We've Got." 

  • Nelsie Spencer's one-woman show Day of the Dead Daddy will be staged by the Marsh Theater in San Francisco as part of the MarshStream 2020 International Solo Fest. 

  • An excerpt of Scott Alexander Hess' novel The Root of Everything appears in Words After Dark: A Lit, Lyrics, and Liquor Anthology

  • Erin Entrada Kelly appeared on the Newbery Tart podcast to talk about the challenge of writing YA heroines who  "don't get up to shenanigans." 

  • "COVID-19 is doing a number on our brain," writes Laura Yeager for PsychCentral.

  • The Believer published Teresa Wong's comic "This Is Not a Feel-Good Movie." 

  • NBC News THINK published Rachel Simon's essay on why Schitt's Creek deserved all of its Emmy awards, and the particular joy of watching underdogs win

  • Kristin Rockaway and her latest novel, She's Faking It, are featured in a roundup in Publishers Weekly, of 2020 authors finding creative new ways to connect with readers. 

  • War on the Rocks published Dewaine Farria's essay "Despite the Yoke." 

  • The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reviewed Tom Cooper's latest novel Florida Man, calling it fresh and surprising, and saying that in "capturing how development erased much of the state’s oddball authenticity...Cooper shows nostalgia for “Old Florida” without being sentimental about, say, roadside zoos packed with miserable animals."

  • "I have a shelf in my office that holds copies of all my work that has appeared in print: my novels, magazines, short story anthologies, and my poetry chapbook. Whenever I get discouraged about my writing career, I look at that shelf. It reminds me that I can do this," says Kirsten Imani Kasai in a featured interview with Shoutout SoCal.

  • The Massachusetts Review published Alanna Schubach's short story "Iris."

  • Lara Ewen's article "Virus-Responsive Design," about libraries redesigning themselves to simultaneously socially-distance patrons and make them more digitally connected than ever, appears in American Libraries magazine. 

  • Hasty Book List interviewed Jessica Sticklor about writing her new novel, how she became a writer in the first place, and the literary character she thinks she's most likely to be friends with

  • Female film critics make up only 35 percent of all reviewers, they review twice as many women-directed films as male critics, and they receive exponentially more online harassment—Mara Reinstein and fellow critic Christy Lemire talked about all that and more on the podcast Rachel's Reviews

  • Publishers Weekly gave Michael Montlack's new poetry collection Daddy a starred review, calling it "rewarding and accomplished."