Faculty News

If you are a student with publication/production news for us, send the info to Dana Miller, dana at gothamwriters dot com.

September 2018

August 2018

  • Jen Glantz is the subject of segments on NBC's Today show and on CNBC, both about her work as a professional bridesmaid and her memoir When You Least Expect It

  • Dan Lopez is an Event Producer for this year's Lambda LitFest Los Angeles

  •  Zaina Arafat's debut novel You Exist Too Much will be published in 2019 by Catapault Books. 

  • Essay Daily included a piece by Kelly Caldwell in its What Happened on June 21, 2018? project, in which writers all over the world describe the events of the same day.

  • Jellyfish Review published Michael Backus' short story "Falling at Fallingwater." 

  • Carole Bugge's forthcoming mystery novel Edinburgh Dusk is now available for pre-order. Written under her pen name Carole Lawrence, it is the second book in her series featuring Scottish detective Ian Hamilton. 

  • Vandalia Press has published Jacob M. Appel's short-story collection The Amazing Mr. MoralityThis is his eighth story collection. 

  • The New Yorker magazine reviewed Akil Kumarasamy's short-story collection Half Gods, in "A Debut Collection Explores Strife, Trauma, and 'a Lifetime of Loving Strangers.' " Farrar, Straus and Giroux released the book on June 5th. 

  • Territory,  a literary project about maps and other strange objects, published Nina Boutsikaris' essay "That's All, I Don't Even Think of You That Often." 

  • Mara Reinstein profiled the actor Kevin Costner for a cover story in Parade magazine. 

  • Gabrielle Bellot's essay "Volcano Dreams" is up at Medium, part of the Unruly Bodies series curated by author Roxane Gay. 

  • Ian S. Port's forthcoming nonfiction book The Birth of Loud is now available for pre-order. Scribner will release it in January.

  • Penguin Books revealed the cover for Seth Fried's forthcoming novel The Municipalists, which is also now available for pre-order. 

  • Joe Okonkwo's short story "The Girls' Table" is included in the anthology Strength, Volume 1, released by Snow Leopard Publishing and benefitting the It Gets Better Project. 

  • "A female Doctor may be a first in Doctor Who history...but strong, capably women have been a staple of the show, right from its inception," writes Jessica Sticklor (under her author's name Jessica Stilling) in "Aztecs, Alien Trysts, and TARDIS Repair—All in a Day's Work for Barbara Wright," for Tor.com.

  • Michael Montlack's poem "The Bachelor's Dilemma" is in the New Orleans Review

  • Lev A.C. Rosen talks with fellow YA author Greg Howard about the "bold characterizations of gay boys we don't see taking center stage very often in YA lit and movies," for LGBTQ Reads

  • Jennifer Keishin Armstrong listed "Five Things You Didn't Know About Sex and the Cityfor Parade magazine. Her nonfiction book Sex and the City and Us came out June 5th from Simon and Schuster. 

  • Laura Yeager used to hate Ellen DeGeneres. (She's over it.) She explains why in her essay "Breast Cancer, Ellen DeGeneres and Me,"  for Cure Today.

  • Jen Glantz was the guest on the podcast The Bubbly Sesh, discussing the Hallmark movie The Wedding March 3 and dishing about weddings, relationships, and Hallmark movies

July 2018

  • School Library Journal gave a starred review to Lev A.C. Rosen's forthcoming YA novel Jack of Hearts and Other Parts, calling it "an essential addition to library collections that serve teens." 

  • Vanessa King was named to the Downtown 100, a list compiled by Vanity Fair contributing writer George Wayne of New York's "Coolest, Most Relevant, Most Creative, Most Influential, Most Inspiring" people in the entertainment industry. 

  • SoHo Press has released Robert Repino's novel D'arc in paperback. 

  • The Kenyon Review included Meghan Kenny's new novel The Driest Season on its summer reading list, calling it "spare, wise, lyrical, and potent." 

  • Jil Picariello reviewed the Off-Broadway play Torch Song Trilogy for ZealNYC, calling it "a not-so-gentle reminder of how far we’ve come, not that it doesn’t seem like very tenuous growth lately."

  • Ashley Shelby reviewed three new nonfiction books about humans and our fascination with (and possible destruction of) the North and South Poles, in "To The Poles — Before They Started Melting," for the New York Times

  • En Route, a short film co-written and directed by Pamela Harris, was a selection of the Lighthouse International Film Festival

  • Nightmare magazine published Seth Fried's short story "Frost Mountain Picnic Massacre."

  • The New Yorker magazine published Weike Wang's short story "Omakase." 

  • Michael Montlack's poem "To My Birth Mother" appears in The Columbia Poetry Review.

  • For New York magazine, Jennifer Keishin Armstrong got together with four former Sex and the City writers, and they brainstormed six plot ideas for the show if it were airing in 2018. Jennifer's nonfiction book Sex and the City and Us came out from Simon and Schuster on June 5th. 

  • "That was the only Kate Spade item I’d ever purchased. It was colorful, it was beautiful, and it was a bit irreverent. It also said to world, 'Cancer didn’t get the best of me,' " writes Laura Yeager in her tribute to Kate Spade, "Eat Cake for Breakfast," published by PyschCentral.

  • Atria Books released Jen Glantz's nonfiction book When You Least Expect It: Essays on Living Without a Five-Year Plan in paperback on June 5. 

  • The Soufan Center released The Forgotten War: The Ongoing Disaster in Yemen, about the worst humanitarian crisis in the world right now, written by Benjamin Buchholz. 

  • Saint Julien Press released Elizabeth Cohen's poetry collection The Patron Saint of Cauliflower.

  • "When voices on the internet become so loud and so vitriolic that artists are afraid to experiment and make mistakes, something very dangerous is happening in our society," says Nora Raleigh Baskin in a talk for TEDx

  • Ada Calhoun talks about selling her upcoming nonfiction book as an audiobook to Audible before selling a print edition, in the New York Times article "Want to Read Michael Lewis's Next Work? You'll Have to Listen to It First."

  • Entropy published Kelly Caldwell's essay "Perihelion," as part of its series On Weather. 

  • Soundtracka playlist/!mix-tape created for the Queens Museum's Mel Chin: All Over the Place exhibit, features Jennifer Marie Brissett reading from her novel Elysium, and is about the length of the average NYC subway ride.

  • James Bosley has been selected as a 2018 member of the Lincoln Center Theater Directors Lab

June 2018

May 2018

  • Vol. 1 Brooklyn published David Rice's short story "Atheism.

  • Ada Calhoun's essay "The Wedding Toast I'll Never Give" is included on Bustle magazine's list of "15 Modern Love Columns Every Millennial Needs to Read." 

  • The Writer magazine features Ashley Shelby and her novel South Pole Station in its article about climate change-themed fiction, "The Rising Tide of Cli-Fi." 

  • Carmen Bugan's essay "Being An Immigrant Writer in America Today" is on PanMacmillan, a blog of the Macmillan publishing company. 

  • Rodale released Matthew Cody's chapter book How to Merit In Monsters, the first in a new series Strange Scout Tales

  • "Leaving aside the months I spent trying to figure out which geographical area the story would be set in (Britain? South Africa? Tahiti!), I figured there had to be some details about geography in the opening paragraph. However, there had to be some significant plot point as well. Something ominous, that would signal this was a mystery story, as well as a travel story." Susan Breen analyzes the opening of her short story "The End of the World" for the series The First Two Pages.  

  • En Route, a short film co-written and directed by Pamela Harris, is an official selection of the Blackbird Film Festival

  • Chloè Caldwell's essay "The Opposite of Light" appears in Lenny.

  • Doubleday announced it will publish C.J. Hauser's next novel, Family of Origin.

  • Weike Wang's essay "Something Left to Prove" appears in Lenny.

  • The Satirist published Jon Reiner's essay "White House Jobs Jared Kushner Can Do." 

  • Scott Alexander Hess talks about the real-life historical figures who inspired the characters in his forthcoming novel The Red River, and how the Mississippi River is a character in the story as well. 

  • Vice published Melissa Petro's essay "What Being a Sex Worker Taught Me About Men." 

  • The Queens Gazette interviewed Marie Carter about writing, history, and why she loves ghost tours in its Local-Express column. 

  • Mike Dunphy wrote "Vermont Has Film Festivals, but Does It Have a Film Industry?" for the Montpelior Bridge

  • Robert Repino's short horror story "Post-Truth" appears in Grotesque Quarterly Magazine

  • Dame magazine published Jennifer Keishin Armstrong's essay "Women Make the Best TV.

  • Jen Glantz's podcast You Aren't Getting Any Younger launched April 1st.

  • Medium published Benjamin Obler's short story "Judy and Merv." 

  • The Writer magazine published Jack Smith's article "Putting Words to Work: Figurative Langage in Fiction Results in Deeper Meanings and Poetic Beauty." 

April 2018

March 2018

  • Kody Keplinger's short story "Walking After Midnight" is included in the anthology All Out: The No-Longer-Secret Stories of Queer Teens Throughout the Ages, released in February by Harlequin Teen.

  • Sarah McColl tracks down the lost artwork of Jo Hopper and other women artists in "Woman In The Sun" for the Paris Review

  • Rodale Kids will release Matthew Cody's middle-grade novel How to Merit in Monsters on April 10th. 

  • Lifehacker published Alanna Schubach's article "How to Write the Personal Statement for College Applications.

  • Jil Picariello reviewed Martin McDonagh's new Off-Broadway play for ZealNYC in "Hangmen at Atlantic is Dark, Dangerous, and Damn Good." 

  • Carole Bugge offers some solid advice in "So You Want to Write Mystery Novels, Eh?" 

  • "I had earned the right to stand out, to be beautiful. I was a survivor, damn it. I was Grace Kelly," writes Laura Yeager in "I Feel Pretty Again After Cancer," for Cure Today.

  • HuffPost published Michael Montlack's essay "My Ancestry DNA Test Revealed Two Sisters I Didn't Know I Had."

  • Susan Breen's article "Stuck: Trapped in the Middle of Your Manuscript? Here's How to Move Forward" is the cover story for the February issue of The Writer magazine. 

  • Zaina Arafat edited and wrote the introduction to Bona Fide Relationships, an anthology of essays, stories, and poems responding to the United States' ban on travelers entering the country from certain nations, most of them majority-Muslim countries. 

  • Ravishly published Jen Glantz's article "The Best Valentine's Day Gifts to Give Someone You're 'Sort of' Dating." 

  • The Satirist published Jon Reiner's essay "Letters to President Trump from Terrified Children." 

  • Olugbemisola Rhuday-Perkovich wrote A Step Into History: The Civil Rights Movement, a history book for middle-grade readers, for Scholastic

  • LitHub published the transcript of a panel discussion featuring T. Kira Madden on silence, "Every Time We Put Pen to Paper, It Is an Act of Protest.

  • "I wanted there to be more books that wanted to read." Kate Angus talks to the Rumpus about why she founded the publisher Augury Books, and what she hopes will happen now that it's an imprint of Brooklyn Arts Press

  • Rolling Stone published Lilly Dancyger's review of the documentary Citizen Rose in "Why New McGowan Doc Is The Messy, Imperfect Show #MeToo Needs."  

  • British artist Angelina Jane created a jewelry collection inspired by Carmen Bugan's poem "House of Stone." 

  • The Haunting of Torre Abbey by Carole Bugge has just been reissued by Titan Books as part of its The Further Adventures of Sherlock Holmes series. 

  • New York magazine's The Cut published Ada Calhoun's essay "What We Mean When We Say Marriage Is 'Work' "

  • Kirkus gave Meghan Kenny's new novel The Driest Season a starred review, calling it "a thoughtful, finely crafted work."

February 2018

January 2018

  • Dominic Preziosi interviewed New York City Public Schools Chancellor Carmen Fariña in "We Want Thinkers, Not Robots," for Commonweal

  • The Rumpus published Amy Shearn's essay "An Open Letter to George Bailey." 

  • Carmen Bugan writes about the poetry of mental illness in her review of Square Inch Hours for The Harvard Review

  • Kaleidoscope, the literary magazine, will publish Laura Yeager's short story "The Almighty Caregiver of the Colonial Apartments" this month.

  • Dame magazine published Jennifer Keishin Armstrong's essay "Why The Odyssey's New Translation Matters to Women." 

  • Shelf Awareness named Ashley Shelby's novel South Pole Station to its list of Best Books of 2017.

  • Nelsie Spencer's novel The Playgroup will be released as an audiobook on January 18th. 

  • The Pulse Theater presented a staged reading of Carole Bugge's play Strings last month at The Producer's Club in New York City.

  • Narratively published Melissa Petro's essay "My Boyfriend Tried a Miracle Cure for Heroin Addiction." 

  • David Farley reviews the London outpost of Malibu Kitchen in "California Dreams (But No Palm Trees) at a London Restaurant" for the New York Times' Travel section. 

  • Skinny Dip named Domenica Ruta's memoir With or Without You to its list of "Fifteen Must-Read Books About Love, Life, and Being a Woman." 

  • Weike Wang's novel Chemistry is longlisted  the Aspen Words Literary Prize, a $35,000 prize for an outstanding work of fiction with social impact, and was named one of NPR's Best Books of 2017

  • Whale Road Review published N. West Moss' interview with author Jordi Alonso and her review of his poetry collection The Lover's Phrasebook

  • "One summer when I was a boy, my father entered into a friendly rivalry with a giant raccoon," writes Seth Fried in his short story "Mendessohn", published by Tin House.

  • Perpetual Motion Machine Publishing has released John Oliver Hodges' novel Quizzleboon.

  • David Leo Rice talks about giant squid, maple syrup, and the 1893 Chicago World's Fair, in an interview at The Coil

  • Tom Brennan's article "Joe Biden's Catholic Faith Is on Full Display on His Current Book Tour" appears in America magazine. 

  • Meerkat Press announced it will publish J.S. Breukelaar's Collision, a collection of a dozen short fantasy and horror stories, plus a novella, in 2019. 

December 2017

November 2017

  • Third Coast magazine published Nina Boutsikaris' essay "The Lights from Houses." 

  • The Piper's Apprentice, the final book in Matthew Cody's middle-grade Pied Piper adventure trilogy, is out now from Alfred A. Knopf Books for Young Readers

  • Robert Repino talks about novels, '80s nostalgia, and Michael Mann with novelist James Scott on the TK Podcast.

  • Girlboss published Jen Glantz's essay "Five Unlikely People You Should Ask For Help When Starting a Business." 

  • The editors of Best American Essays 2017 cited work by several Gotham teachers as Notable Essays and Literary Nonfiction: Kate Angus for "When We Were Vikings;" Jacob Appel for "Why Get There from Here?"; and Shahnaz Habib for "A Letter to My Daughter About Palindromes." 

  • "Discussions of representation are important. But first there must be access." Kody Keplinger writes about the challenges facing disabled readers for Kirkus

  • Laura Yeager is blogging for Cure Today. Recent posts include "One Breasted Woman" and "Once a Cancer Writer, Always a Cancer Writer." 

  • Mike Dunphy writes about a poetry jukebox, a book wormhole, and the Prague Golem in "Ten Ways This European City Keeps It Weird—Really Weird" for Fodor's Travel.

  • Liveright Publishing, an imprint of W.W. Norton & Company, will publish Sarah McColl's memoir Joy Enough in 2019. 

  • Power plays, manipulations, and open kitchens — Susan Breen explores what writers can learn from the TV show House Hunters for the Miss Demeanors

  • The science fiction anthology Welcome to Dystopia: 45 Visions of What Lies Ahead includes stories from three Gotham instructors: J.S. Breukelaar, Jennifer Marie Brissett, and Paul Witcover. The book of stories about what the near future might hold is available for pre-order and will be released in December. 

  • "There is a way in which telling the story of what it means to live inside your own body becomes a target itself. The words of your story will balloon into punching bags. People will try to strip you of your very body-hood. Don’t let them. Be louder." T. Kira Madden talks about writing, courage, and the beauty of shaping experiences into stories, at The Tempest

  • Marie Claire published Melissa Petro's essay "Why I Support the Choice to Be Pregnant and a Prostitute." 

  • Lilly Dancyger explains "The Real Reason Nobody Is Talking about the DNC Fraud Lawsuit" for Playboy

  • Kirkus reviewed Jacob Appel's short story collection The Liars' Asylum, (released last month by Black Lawrence Press), calling it "a fine collection that amply demonstrates Appel's gifts." Meanwhile, Gallery Books, an imprint of Simon & Schuster, will release his new novel Millard Salter's Last Day on November 7th. 

  • Carmen Bugan will be interviewed by Sir Christopher Ricks during the Boston University European Studies Poetry Series on November 13.

  • "Moss's unerring ear allows her to tackle big thematic questions while never breaking away from her characters' voices," says The Literary Review of N. West Moss' short-story collection The Subway Stops at Bryant Park. Leapfrog Press released the book in May. 

October 2017

  • The New York Times published Elizabeth Cohen's essay "A Plague and a Blessing in My Empty Nest." 

  • Lilly O'Donnell wrote "The Man Who's Been Fighting for Medicinal Psychedelics For 45 Years" for Narratively

  • Electric Literature published Ben Obler's essay "How Writing Closed Captions Turned Me Off TV For Good." 

  • Nelsie Spencer's comic novel The Playgroup will come out in audiobook in November. 

  • Jody Gray is the Composer/Songwriter/Musical Director of the animated TV series Space Racers, which this fall will be a lynchpin on the new NBC Universal Kids Network.

  • Poets & Writers magazine published an excerpt of Carmen Bugan's memoir Burying the Typewriter

  • Vice published Melissa Petro's essay "I Had the Best Sex of My Life While Pregnant." 

  • On the same day it released her latest novel Run in paperback, Scholastic announced that it will publish Kody Keplinger's next YA novel That's Not What Happened in fall 2018. 

  • The Authors Guild Bulletin published Barbara DeMarco-Barrett's article "The Enemy Within." 

  • Narrative Species featured Robert Repino and his latest novel D'Arc in its article "Empowering Fun." 

  • Electric Literature published Alanna Schubach's essay "Actually, an All-Girls Lord of the Flies Could Be a Good Idea." 

  • Ian Port endured the hardship reporting for his article "One Great Place to Get a Beer in Every NYC Neighborhood" in StreetEasy.

  • The New York Times published Zaina Arafat's article "When Getting a College Degree Requires Self-Exile." 

  • Jil Picariello makes a few recommendations for what to see on Broadway this fall, for ZEALnyc

  • Oyster River Pages published Michael Backus' short story "Act of Love."

  • Stacy Parker Le Melle published her essay "Liberty and Justice for All: A Call to the Democratic Party" on Medium

  • LitHub published Ashley Shelby's essay "Toward a New Climate Change Genre: First Impact Fiction." 

  • Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine published Susan Breen's short story "The Countess of Warsaw." In September, Susan's novel Maggie Dove reached No. 1 on Amazon's best-sellers list in the Cozy Mysteries category. 

  • Black Lawrence Press will release Jacob Appel's latest short story collection The Liars' Asylum on October 15th.

  • "Altogether, her stories illustrate the importance of a gathering place such as Bryant Park, once a haven for druggies that was reclaimed in the 1990s," writes the Minneapolis Star-Tribune in its review of N. West Moss' short-story collection The Subway Stops in Bryant Park

  • Laura Yeager's article "The PSR Special Needs Program at Holy Family Parish in Stow, Ohio" appears in Catechist Magazine.