Faculty Bios

We proudly offer the bios of our accomplished teachers.

Michael Backus is the author of the novels The Vanishing Point (Cactus Moon Books) and the chapbook Coney on the Moon (Redbird Chapbooks). His short stories and nonfiction have appeared in One Story, Okey Panky, Channel, Parhelion Literary Review, Jellyfish Review, Cleaver, Digging Through the Fat, Oyster River Pages, Prime Number, and Exquisite Corpse. He has taught at Columbia College and Marymount Manhattan College. He holds a BA from Purdue University and an MFA from Columbia College.

Maria Alejandra Barrios has published short stories in Cosmonauts Avenue, Jellyfish Review, Bandit Fiction, Lost Balloon, Reservoir Journal, Vol. 1 Brooklyn, Fresh Ink, El Malpensante, WaxWing Mag, SmokeLong Quarterly, and Shenandoah Literary. She has taught for the Universidad Del Norte Barranquilla, Paragraph New York, and the Beaubourg Theatre in New Orleans. She holds a BA from the Universidad de los Andes and an MA in Creative Writing from the University of Manchester.

Chelsea Bieker is the author of the novel Godshot (Catapault Press). Her short stories have appeared in Granta, McSweeney’s, Joyland, No Tokens, Cincinnati Review, Cosmonauts Avenue, and The Normal School. Her nonfiction has appeared in Electric Literature, Catapault, Pregnancy and Newborn, and she has been a columnist for Propeller Magazine. She is the recipient of a Rona Jaffe Foundation Award. She has taught at Portland State University and Harrisburg Area Community College. She holds a B.S. from California Polytechnic State University and an MFA in Fiction from Portland State University.

Susan Breen is the author of the Maggie Dove mystery series, originally published by Penguin Random House/Alibi and soon to be rereleased by Under the Oak Press, as well as the novel The Fiction Class (Plume/Headline Review UK). Her short stories have appeared in American Literary Review, the Chattahoochee Review, Alfred Hitchcock Mystery Magazine, and Ellery Queen’s Mystery Magazine, as well as the anthologies Best American Nonrequired Reading and Murder Most Diabolical. She holds a BA from the University of Rochester and an MA in Economics from Columbia University.

Adela Brito has published short stories in Acentos Review, Litbreak Magazine, Hieroglyph, and Moko Magazine, and she is a former fiction editor of The Pinch literary journal. Her nonfiction and poetry have appeared in Writer’s Digest, Underwood, Adelaide Literary Magazine, All About Jazz, c-nf, Counterculture UK, and Storyboard Memphis. She has taught at the University of Memphis and Nashville State Community College. She holds a BA from Florida International University and an MFA in Fiction from the University of Memphis.

Benjamin Buchholz is the author of the novel One Hundred and One Nights (Back Bay Books/Little, Brown), the nonfiction book Private Soldiers (Wisconsin Historical Society Press), and two poetry chapbooks:Thirteen Stares (Magic Helicopter Press) and Windshield (BlazeVox Press). He is also co-author, with Sam Farran, of the memoir The Tightening Dark: An American Hostage in Yemen (Hachette). His short stories have appeared in Storyglossia, Hobart, Mad Hatter’s Review, and Prime Number Magazine, and been anthologized in the Dzanc Press Best of the Web collections. His nonfiction has appeared in Military Review, Infantry, and The Writer. He has served as a foreign area officer and U.S. Army attaché in Oman and Yemen, and lectured at Princeton University. He holds a BA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, completed the Omani Royal Air Force Staff College in Arabic Language, and holds an MA in Near East Studies from Princeton University.

Angie Chatman is a contributor to Business Insider and iPondr, and her short stories have been anthologized in Dine (Hippocampus Books), and appeared in Pangyrus, the Rumpus, YahooLife, Blood Orange Review, Hippocampus magazine, fwriction:review, and the blog Slice of MIT. She has performed stories for The MOTH, the RISK! podcast, StoryCollider, MassMouth, Tell-All Boston, and the TV series Stories from the Stage (WGBH). She has taught for the University of Hartford, Tunxis Community College, and Des Moines Area Community College. She holds a BS from the Illinois Institute of Technology, an MS in Economics from MIT Sloan, and an MFA in Fiction and Creative Nonfiction from Queens University of Charlotte.

Philip Cioffari is the author of the novels If Anyone Asks, Say I Died From the Heartbreaking Blues, The Bronx Kill, Jesusville, Catholic Boysand Dark Road, Dead End, as well as the short story collection A History of Things Lost or Broken, (all Livingston Press/University of West Alabama). His short fiction has appeared in the Southern Humanities Review, the Westchester Review, the North American Review, the Connecticut Review, Italian Americana, and been anthologized in Wild Dreams (Fordham University Press), 100 Percent Pure Florida Fiction (University of Florida Press), and Many Lights in Many Windows (Milkweed Editions). His plays have been staged or received staged readings at The Actors Studio, the Belmont Playhouse, the Gettysburg College New Plays Festival, and the Circle Repertory Lab, among many others. He wrote and directed the feature film Love in the Age of Dion, which won Best Director at the New York Independent Film and Video Festival, played at many film festivals including the Rhode Island International Film Festival and the Wildwood-By-The-Sea Festival, and was selected for the New Filmmakers NY series. He teaches at William Paterson University. He holds a Ph.D from New York University.

Tom Cooper is the author of the novels Florida Man (Random House) and The Marauders (Broadway Books/Crown Publishing). His short stories have appeared in the Mid-American Review, Gulf Coast, Boulevard, Smokelong Quarterly, and Oxford American. He has taught at Florida State University, Nicholls State University, the University of Central Florida, and the University of South Florida-Tampa. He holds a BA from Florida Atlantic University, an MA in Literature from the University of South Florida, and a Ph.D in Creative Writing from Florida State University.

Tommy Dean is founding editor and editor-in-chief of Fractured Lit. He is the author of the flash-fiction chapbook Special Like the People on TV, and his short stories have appeared in Lascaux Review, New World Writing, Cleaver Magazine, Newfound, New Flash Fiction Review, Blink Ink, After the Pause, Lost Balloon, Longleaf Review, Bending Genres, Pithead Chapel, Citron Review, The Offing, Magnolia Review, Wilderness House, Avalon Literary Review, Boston Literary Magazine, and Watershed Review, and been anthologized in Best Microfiction and Best Small Fictions. He has taught for Ivy Tech Community College and Indiana Tech University. He holds a BA from Valparaiso University and an MFA in Creative Writing-Fiction from Queens University of Charlotte.

Anita Diggs is co-author, with Ida Keeling, of the memoir Can't Nothing Bring Me Down: Chasing Myself in the Race Against Time (Zondervan). She is the author of four novels, including A Meeting in the Ladies Room, (Kensington Books), and the nonfiction book Talking Drums: An African-American Quote Collection (St. Martin’s Press). She has served as senior editor and director of One World Books for Ballantine/Random House. She has taught at Salem College. She holds a BA from the State University of New York/Empire State College and an MFA in Creative Writing/Memoir from Hunter College.

Carter Edwards is the author of the short story collection The Aversive Clause (Black Lawrence Press/Dzanc) and the poetry collections From the Standard Cyclopedia of Recipes (Black Lawrence Press/Dzanc) and To Mend Small Children (Augury Books), and his work is included in the anthologies Diving Divas and Zombiality. He has published poetry, fiction, and nonfiction in the New York Times Magazine, La Petite Zine, Freerange Nonfiction, Sink Review, Pax Americana, and Brooklyn Rail. He has served as an executive producer at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater in New York. He holds a BA from Reed College and an MFA in Creative Writing from the New School. 

Rachel Engelman is a winner of the Stella Kupferberg Memorial Short Story Prize (with a story performed on Selected Shorts), and her short stories have appeared in Electric Literature, Crazyhorse, Iowa Review, and Diario Clarín, and been anthologized in the Masters Review Anthology. She is the founder of the Walrus School, a creative writing school in Buenos Ares, Argentina. She holds a BA from Skidmore College and an MFA in Fiction from the University of Texas.

Dewaine Farria is the author of the novel Revolutions of All Colors (Syracuse University Press), and his short stories have appeared in the Southern Humanities Review, CRAFT Literary, and Drunken Boat. His nonfiction has appeared in the Rumpus, the New York Times, War on the Rocks, the Mantle, and Afropunk. He is a contributing editor for the Maine Review. As a U.S. Marine he served in Jordan and Ukraine, and for the United Nations, he served in the North Caucasus, Kenya, Somalia, and Occupied Palestine. He holds a BS from the University of the State of New York-Albany, an MA in International and Area Studies from the University of Oklahoma, and an MFA in Creative Writing from the Vermont College of Fine Arts.

Janet Flora has published nonfiction in Yalabusha Review, Willow Review, Forge, and the Sanskrit Literary-Arts Magazine. Her short stories have appeared in New Orleans Review, North Dakota Quarterly, Portland Review, and Hawaii Pacific Review. She has taught at NYU and the School of Visual Arts. She holds a BA from City University, Richmond College, and an MFA in Creative Nonfiction from The New School.

Seth Fried is the author of the novel The Municipalists (Penguin) and the short story collection The Great Frustration (Soft Skull Press/Counterpoint). His short stories have appeared in Kenyon Review, McSweeney’s Quarterly Concern, Missouri Review, One Story, and Tin House. His work has been anthologized in the Better of McSweeney’s and the Pushcart Prizes XXV: The Best of the Small Presses, and twice named a Distinguished Story by the editors of the Best American Short Stories series. He has been regular contributor to Shouts & Murmurs in the New Yorker and to NPR's Selected Shorts. He has worked as an assistant editor at the Mid-American Review. He holds a BA from Bowling Green State University.

Serrana Laure Gay has published short stories in North Dakota Quarterly, the Hunger Journal, X-R-A-Y Literary Magazine, and Prometheus Dreaming. She is the author of the illustrated book Fatty Fatty No Friends (Mind the Art Entertainment), adapted from her operetta of the same name, which was winner of the Best of Fest prize at the New York Musical Theatre Festival. Her plays have been workshopped or appeared at the New York International Fringe Festival, Joe’s Pub at the Public Theatre, the National Opera Center, the Frigid NY theatre festival, the HERE Arts Center, and Feinstein’s 54 Below. She has taught at the Sarah Lawrence College Writing Institute. She holds a BFA from Ithaca College and an MFA in Writing from Sarah Lawrence College.

Jon Gingerich has published short stories in The Saturday Evening Post, Malahat Review, Pleiades, Grist, Stand Magazine, Helix Magazine, and Oyez Review. He is the senior editor of O’Dwyer’s magazine. He holds a BA from Ohio State University and an MFA from The New School.

Varud Gupta is the author of the graphic novel Chhotu: A Tale of Partition and Love and the nonfiction travel memoir Bhagwaan Ke Pakwaan: Food of the Gods (both Penguin Random House). His food and travel articles have appeared in National Geographic, among others, and he is a beverage culture and history columnist for Mint Lounge. He has worked as head of originals for the production studio Resting Kitsch Face, and taught for the Indian Institute of Art and Design. He holds a BS from New York University.

Brendan Halpin is the author of the novels Dear Catastrophe Waitress, Long Way Backand Donorboy (all by Villard); the memoirs Losing My Faculties and It Takes a Worried Man (both by Villard); and the author or co-author of eight young adult novels, including Legacy (Gum Road), Forever Changes (by Farrar, Straus & Giroux), Tessa Masterson Will Go To Prom (Walker Books), and A Really Awesome Mess (Egmont USA). His nonfiction has appeared in the New York Times, the Boston Globe, the Los Angeles Times, the Sunday Times (of London) Magazine, Best Life Magazine, Rosie Magazine, and Ladies’ Home Journal. He has taught at Emmanuel College, Bunker Hill Community College, and the Wentworth Institute of Technology. He holds a BA from the University of Pennsylvania and an MA in Teaching from Tufts University.

Season Harper-Fox has published fiction, poetry, and book reviews in Cream City Review, Rocky Mountain Review of Modern Language and Literature, OnTheBus, and Primavera, and she has served as editorial assistant for Prairie Schooner. She has taught at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln and the University of Nebraska-Omaha. She holds a BA and an MA in Creative Writing from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Scott Alexander Hess is the author of five novels, including Skyscraper, a Lambda Literary Award Finalist, The Butcher's Sons, named a Kirkus Reviews Best Book of 2015 (both Lethe Press), and a pair of novellas The Root of Everything & Lightning (Rebel Satori Press). His work has appeared in HuffPost, Genre Magazine, The Fix, and Thema Literary Review. He co-wrote “Tom in America,” an award-winning short film, and curates Hot Lit, an LGBTQ+ themed monthly newsletter. He holds a BJ from the University of Missouri-Columbia and an MFA in Fiction from The New School.

Anu Jindal has published short stories and essays in Electric Literature, Pioneer Magazine, New Quarterly, Matrix, and Joyland. He has worked as a contributing editor at Electric Literature, curator and co-administrator for the Visiting Writers Series at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and an assistant editor on the television show On Record: The History of Recorded Music (PBS). He has taught at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Baruch College Writing Center, and the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. He holds a BA from Dalhousie University and an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

Elane Johnson has published short stories and nonfiction in Brevity, Creative Nonfiction, Current, the Gnu, Hippocampus, the Indianapolis Star, Sonora Review, and Superstition Review, and in the anthologies Southern Sin (In Fact Books) and From the Depths (Haunted Waters Press). One of her essays was a finalist for the Mark Twain Humor Prize. She has taught at American Public University, A.T. Still University, Central Georgia Technical College, and Southern New Hampshire University, where she received the Excellence in Teaching Award. She holds a BA from Mercer University and an MFA in Creative Writing from National University.

R. Dean Johnson is the author of the novel Californium (Plume Books) and the short story collection Delicate Men (Alternative Book Press). His short stories and essays have appeared in Ascent, Hawai’i Pacific Review, Louisville Review, New Orleans Review, Natural Bridge, Ruminate, Santa Clara Review, Slice, and Southern Review, and in the anthologies Agave (Ink Brush Press) and A Tribute to Orpheus (Kearney Street Books). He served as fiction editor at Hayden’s Ferry Review and editor of the anthology Teachable Moments: Essays on Experiential Education (University Press of America). He has taught at Arizona State University, Prescott College, Cameron University, and Eastern Kentucky University. He holds a BS from California State Polytechnic, an MA in English from Kansas State University, and an MFA in Creative Writing from Arizona State University.

Matt Jones has published short stories in McSweeney’s, Post Road, Ruminate, Scalawag Magazine, Whitefish Review, and the Chicago Tribune; speculative short stories in Beneath Ceaseless Skies, Phantom Drift: A Journal of New Fabulism, Interfictions: A Journal of Interstitial Arts, and the Golden Key; and essays in The Atlantic, the Cincinnati Enquirer, Electric Literature’s Okey-Pankey, Entropy, Hippocampus, Michigan Quarterly Review, Penny, and Slice Magazine. He has taught at Xavier University, the University of Cincinnati, and the University of Alabama. He holds a BA from St. Edward’s University and an MFA in Creative Writing-Prose from the University of Alabama.

Jaime Karnes has published fiction and nonfiction in Granta, Adirondack Review, Opium Magazine, and PopMatters. She is an editor-at-large in fiction at The Utopian. She has taught at Rutgers and Southern New Hampshire University. She holds a BA from the University of Kansas and an MFA in Fiction from Rutgers-Newark University.

Kirsten Imani Kasai is the author of the novels The House of Erzulie (Shade Mountain Press), Ice Song, a Barnes & Noble Feature Pick, and Tattoo (both Random House). Her short stories and poetry have appeared in Transition, Arts & Letters, Existere Journal of Arts and Literature, Drunk Monkeys, Disturbed Digest, Body Parts Magazine, San Diego Reader, and Pretty Owl Poetry. Her nonfiction has appeared in the American Journal of Economics and Sociology, Re-Discover MSN—San Diego, About Town Magazine, and Annotation Nation, as well as the anthologies My Cruel Invention (Meerkat Press) and The Body Horror Book (Oscillate Wildly Press). She has worked as the managing editor of San Diego Family Magazine, and taught at San Diego State University, Emporia State University, and Southern New Hampshire University. She holds a BA from Ashford University and an MFA from Antioch University.

Rosalie Morales Kearns is the founder of Shade Mountain Press, an independent publisher of literary fiction. She is the author of the novel Kingdom of Women (Jaded Ibis Press) and the short-story collection Virgins & Tricksters (Aqueous Books), and her short stories, nonfiction, and poetry have appeared in Drunken Boat, Entropy, Fiction Writers Review, Luna Luna, PANK, and Yes, Poetry. She edited the anthology The Female Complaint: Tales of Unruly Women (Shade Mountain Press), and her work has appeared in the anthologies Arcana (Minor Arcana Press) and Nasty Women Poets (Lost Horse Press). She has taught at the State University of New York at Albany, the University of Illinois, and the Arts Center of the Capital Region. She holds a BA from Fordham University, an MA in Russian Language/Literature from the University of Pittsburgh, and an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Illinois.

Erin Entrada Kelly is the author of the middle grade novels Hello Universe, winner of the Newbery Medal; We Dream of Spacea Newbery Honor book; Maybe, Maybe, Marisol Rainey; Lalani of the Distant Sea; You Go First; The Land of Forgotten Girls; and Blackbird Fly (all HarperCollins). Her short stories have appeared in the Dead Mule School of Southern Literature, Tayo Special Issue, Adroit Journal, Danse Macabre, Every Day Fiction, and Boston Literary Magazine. She is a contributor to Library Journal and has been a writer and editor for Thrive Magazine, where she won awards for excellence in feature writing from the Louisiana Press Association and the Associated Press. She has taught for Rosemont College and Wallingford Swarthmore Community Classes. She holds a BA from McNeese State University and an MFA in Fiction from Rosemont College.

Z Kennedy-Lopez has published fiction and essays in Foglifter, Autostraddle, Hobart Pulp, Storm Cellar, A Velvet Giant, among many others. They have taught at the University of California, Davis, Rutgers University-Camden, and the Cooper Street Writing Workshops. They hold a BA from Southern Oregon University, an MA in English from the University of California, Davis, and an MFA in Creative Writing from Rutgers University-Camden.

Megan Kruse is the author of the novel Call Me Home (Hawthorne Books). She has published short stories and nonfiction in Narrative Magazine, Drunken Boat, Witness Magazine, The Sun, Bellingham Review, and Psychology Today, and her short fiction is included in the anthologies Portland Noir (Akashic) and Portland Queer (Lit Star Press). She was named a 5 Under 35 honoree by the National Book Awards. She has taught for Eastern Oregon University, the University of Montana, Ashford University, Badgerdog in Austin, and Hugo House in Seattle. She holds a BA from Oberlin College and an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Montana.

Cleve Lamison is the author of the science fiction novel Full-Blood Half-Breed (Penguin Random House), and he is a contributing writer to Suvudu.com, a science fiction and fantasy blog at Random House. He is a staff writer for the television show Craig Ross Jr.’s Monogamy (Urban Movie Channel), and he wrote and directed the feature film Following Bliss, which won Best Feature Film at the Global Arts International Film Festival. His short film "The Story" won the Denver World Film Festival, and his short film "Jack for President" was a runner-up in the New York 24-Hour Filmmaking Contest. He was the artistic director of the BlackBird Theatre Company in NYC; created, wrote, and drew the cartoon strip Rick the Roach for the Richmond News Leader; and is a veteran of the U.S. Army Reserves. He holds a BA from Virginia Commonwealth University.

Casandra Lopez has published short stories in the Packinghouse Review, Flyaway, Potomac Review, California Journal of Women Writers, Unmanned Press, and the anthologies Best Small Fictions and Dimestories. She is the author of the poetry collection Brother Bullet (University of Arizona Press) and the chapbook Where Bullet Breaks (Sequoyah National Research Center), and her poetry has appeared in Bellingham Review, NewBorder, Malpais Review, Hobart, Indian Country Today, Más Tequila Review, and Hamilton Stone Review. She is a founder/managing editor of the literary journal As/Us, and she has taught for the University of New Mexico, Northwest Indian College, North Seattle Community College, and for Upward Bound. She holds a BS from Cornell, an MA in Educational Counseling from the University of Redlands, and an MFA in Fiction from the University of New Mexico.

Dan Lopez is the author of the novel The Show House (Unnamed Press), named a Best Book by Chicago Review of Books, and the short story collection Part the Hawser, Limn the Sea (Chelsea Station Editions). He is an assistant editor at Counterpoint Press and has published short stories in Storychord, Ducts, Prick of the Spindle, and the anthology With: New Gay Fiction (Chelsea Station Editions). His nonfiction has appeared in Los Angeles Review of Books,Time Out New York, The Collagist, The Millions, and Lamda Literary. He holds a BA from the University of Central Florida.

Christine Meade is the author of the novel The Way You Burn (She Writes Press), and her personal essays have appeared in the Boston Globe, Chicago Literati, HuffPost, the Manifest-Station, and Writer’s Digest. She has taught for 826 Boston, Lasell College, and Curry College. She holds a BA from Northeastern University and an MFA in Creative Writing from California College of the Arts.

N. West Moss is the author of the memoir Flesh and Blood (Algonquin) and the short story collection The Subway Stops at Bryant Park (Leapfrog Press). Her short stories have appeared in McSweeney’s, The Saturday Evening Post, Stockholm Review, Blotter Magazine, and Westchester Review. Her nonfiction has appeared in Salon, the New York Times, Brevity, River Teeth, and Ars Medica. She has taught at William Paterson University, Montclair State University, and Passaic County Community College. She holds a BA from Sarah Lawrence College, a Master of Secondary Education from Mercy College, an MFA in Creative Writing from William Paterson University, and a CPA in Narrative Medicine from Columbia University.

Amy Sue Nathan is the author of the novels The Last Bathing Beauty (Lake Union Publishing), Left to Chance, The Good Neighbor, and The Glass Wives, (all St. Martin’s Press). She has been a columnist for the Chicago Tribune, and her essays have appeared in the New York Times, Psychology Today, Imperfect Parent, Writer’s Digest, and Writer Unboxed. She writes the Women’s Fiction Writers blog, and has taught for the Chicago Writers Workshop, the Philadelphia Writers Workshop, and Writer’s Digest. She holds a BA in journalism from Temple University.

Benjamin Obler is the author of the novel Javascotia (Penguin UK). His short stories and essays have appeared in The Guardian, London Times, Mirror, Electric Literature, Long Reads, Puerto Del Sol, The Junction, Belle Ombre, Qwerty, Sundress, Thirty-Two, Cottonwood, and Evansville Review. He has taught at the Loft Literary Center. He holds a BA from the University of St. Thomas and an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Glasgow.

Dalia Pagani is the author of the novel Mercy Road (Delacorte). Her short stories and essays have appeared in Story, Portsmouth Review, Green Mountains Review, Hayden's Ferry Review, Omnificent, and Cruising World. She has taught at Plymouth State University, Lebanon College, and Johnson State College. She holds a BA and an MFA in Writing from Vermont College.

Christine Reilly is the author of the novel Sunday’s on the Phone to Monday (Simon & Schuster), and the poetry chapbooks Too Animal, Not Enough Machine (Sundress Publications) and Mano a Mano: Or Relationship Neither Here Nor There (Shoe Music Press). She has written young adult e-books for the Sh! Pass It On series (Palindrome Media). Her short stories and poetry have appeared in Adirondack Review, Brooklyn Review, FriGG, and Lifelines. She has taught at Sarah Lawrence College, the Dalton School, and the Collegiate School. She holds a BA from Bucknell University and an MFA in English from Sarah Lawrence College.

Kristin Rockaway is the author of the novels Life, Unscheduled (Montlake), How to Hack a HeartbreakShe’s Faking It(both Graydon House), and The Wild Woman’s Guide to Traveling the World (Center Street), as well as the young adult novel My Epic Spring Break (Up). She’s written essays and blog posts for Fresh Fiction, Frolic, Novel Novice, We Heart Writing, and Women Writers, Women’s Books. She holds a BA from New York University.

Lynda Sandoval is the author of more than 20 novels including Unsettling, (Rayo/Harper Collins), the young adult novels Who’s Your Daddy?, Chicks Ahoy (both Simon Pulse), and Father Knows Best (Bold Strokes Books), and the Amgias Y Amor romance series (Bold Stroke Books) and the Return to Troublesome Gulch series (Silhouette Books). She is a former police officer with the Wheat Ridge (Colorado) Police Department and a former 911 and fire department dispatcher with the Littleton (Colorado) Fire Department. She has taught Constitutional rights classes for middle school students and has served as a novel writing mentor with the Nevada Chapter of the Society of Children's Book Writers and Illustrators. She holds a BS from the Metropolitan State University of Denver. 

Alanna Schubach is the author of the novel The Nobodies (Blackstone Publishing). Her short stories have appeared in Sewanee Review, Massachusetts Review, Juked, and Electric Literature's Recommended Reading. Her nonfiction has appeared in The Atlantic, The NationJacobin, the Washington Post, the Village Voice, and the LA Review of Books. She has taught at the Japan Exchange and Teaching Program, the College Readiness Program, the Westchester County Department of Corrections, and Girls Write Now. She holds a BA from American University and an MFA in Fiction from Sarah Lawrence College.

Radhika Sharma is the author of the novel Mangoes for Monkeys and the short story collection Parikrama, (both Frog Books/Leadstart Publishing). Her short fiction has appeared in the Santa Clara Review and The Fanzine, and her essays, reviews, and articles have appeared in the San Jose Mercury News, the San Francisco Chronicle, the Times of India, the Economic Times, Pacific Time, Perspectives, In the Fray, and the Forum on KQED FM, among many others. She is a former assistant fiction editor for 14Hills literary magazine, and she has taught for San Francisco State University, Milipitas Adult Education, and the Learning Bee. She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from San Francisco State University.

Divya Sood is the author of the novels Find Someone to Love and Nights Like This (both Riverdale Avenue Books). Her short stories have won the New Jersey Arts and Letters First Prize for Short Fiction and appeared in The Masters Review. She has taught at Rutgers University and Southern New Hampshire University. She holds a BA from Rutgers University and an MA in English from New York University. 

Nelsie Spencer is the author of the novel The Playgroup, (St. Martin’s Press). She wrote the feature screenplay A Girl's Best Friend and co-wrote the feature film Valley Inn, which debuted at the Palm Beach International Film Festival. She wrote, produced, and co-hosted the radio show The Radio Ritas, (Greenstone Media) and hosts the podcast Losing It. She co-wrote and starred in the play My Heart Belongs To Daddy, produced at the Pittsburgh Public Theater and Duke University’s Pre-Broadway series, and her one-woman show Goodbye Cream played at the When I’m 34 Festival in Los Angeles. She studied dance and theater at Orange Coast College, and fiction at The New School.

Jessica Sticklor (also writing as Jessica Stilling and J.M. Stephen) is the author of the novels The Weary God of Ancient Travelers (D.X Faros), The Beekeeper's Daughter (Bedazzled Ink Press), and Betwixt and Between (Ig Publishing), and the young adult Pan Chronicles series (D.X. Faros). Her short stories have appeared in The Paper Nautilus, Open Wide Magazine, Conclave, The Skyline Review, Chiron Review, and Kudzu, and her nonfiction has appeared in The Writer, Ms., and Tor.com. She has worked as an editor at The House of Books. She holds a BA from The New School and an MFA in Creative Writing from CUNY.

Arlaina Tibensky is the author of the novel And Then Things Fall Apart (Simon & Schuster). Her short stories and nonfiction have appeared in One Story, McSweeney's, Madison Review, Literary Mama, The Dinner Party Download on NPR, and the anthology New Stories from the Midwest 2018 (New American Press). She holds a BA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and an MFA in Fiction from Columbia University.